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Hydraulic gear for switch

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000240170D
Publication Date: 2015-Jan-08
Document File: 7 page(s) / 190K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

According to the present disclosure, the hydraulic gear comprises at least a first piston arranged to be directly or indirectly operated by a drive (e.g. a puffer) of the switch, and a second piston arranged for operating a switch member of the switch. The first and second pistons are slidably arranged in a housing filled with an operating fluid (hydraulic fluid), and coupled to each other by the operating fluid such that movement of one of the first and second pistons causes, through pressurization of the operating fluid, movement of the other one of the first and second pistons. Preferably, the movement of the first piston and the induced movement of the second piston are in opposite directions.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 25% of the total text.

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Hydraulic gear for switch

Authors: F. Pisu, D. Ohlsson, S. Kotilainen, and J. Korbel, all of ABB Switzerland Ltd.

TECHNICAL FIELD

The present disclosure in general relates to a gear for a switch, such as a high-voltage circuit breaker.

BACKGROUND OF THE DISCLOSURE

In many types of switches, in particular high voltage circuit breakers, gears are used to move a plurality of contact elements or other parts of the switches in a coordinated manner by a common drive. In particular, gears are used for moving opposing contacts (e.g. arcing contacts and/or nominal contacts) in opposite directions, thereby increasing their relative velocities. Conventionally, these gears are mechanical assemblies, in which generally levers or gear wheels are used.

SUMMARY

The present disclosure aims at providing a hydraulic gear for an electrical switch, which hydraulic gear has reduced complexity, wear, and failure risks compared to conventional gears.

According to the present disclosure, the hydraulic gear comprises at least a first piston arranged to be directly or indirectly operated by a drive (e.g. a puffer) of the switch, and a second piston arranged for operating a switch member of the switch. The first and second pistons are slidably arranged in a housing filled with an operating fluid (hydraulic fluid), and coupled to each other by the operating fluid such that movement of one of the first and second pistons causes, through pressurization of the operating fluid, movement of the other one of the first and second pistons. Preferably, the movement of the first piston and the induced movement of the second piston are in opposite directions.

The first and second piston may be coupled to a first and second volume within the housing, respectively, so that a sliding movement of the pistons results in a variation of the respective volumes. The first and second volume are filled with the operating fluid and are preferably fluidly coupled to each other by an orifice, such the operating fluid being pressurized in one of the volumes is transmitted towards or into the other volume. The first and second volume are preferably arranged at a front side of the first and second pistons, respectively; and a third and fourth volume (again filled with the operating fluid) are preferably arranged at a back side of the first and second pistons, respectively, and are also fluidly coupled to each other by a second orifice.

Different inert fluids (liquids) can be used as the operating fluid to transmit the forces between the first and second piston.

The hydraulic gear is preferably used for a gas-insulated switch, such as a high-voltage circuit breaker. The hydraulic gear can be arranged inside or outside of the gas-tight housing of the switch or circuit breaker.


08.01.2015


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DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF EMBODIMENTS

An embodiment of the hydraulic gear is depicted schematically in Figs. 1 and 2. Fig. 1 illustrates the gear in a closing operation and Fig. 2...