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A STRATEGY TO LOWER HYDROCARBON EMISSIONS IN URBAN AREAS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000240275D
Publication Date: 2015-Jan-20
Document File: 1 page(s) / 260K

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The IP.com Prior Art Database

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A STRATEGY TO LOWER HYDROCARBON EMISSIONS IN URBAN AREAS

Vehicles sold in North America are required to adsorb diurnal, running loss and refueling vapors inside a carbon canister. Hydrocarbon (HC) vapors contribute to smog and it is undesirable to emit them into the atmosphere, as smog may contribute to health issues. The canister is typically cleaned or purged using engine vacuum during combustion. A CPV valve is opened to purge the canister by bringing in fresh air to displace trapped HCs. Vehicles sold in North America are also required to perform leak detection on the EVAP system. Leaky Evap systems tend to emit more HC into the atmosphere and contribute to smog. Some cities have Ozone Action Days, when weather is typically hot and air quality is low due to smog. These cities attempt to mitigate smog by issuing an alert to reduce driving, limit refueling (or refuel after 6 pm) and minimize engine idling. These alerts are based on the honor system and there is no enforcement/penalty for drivers who violate the alert.

Method

During an Ozone Action Day, the local community emergency system broadcasts the alert to the vehicle through X2V connectivity. At that point, the vehicle's onboard strategy is alerted that this is an ozone action day and displays the message on the vehicle's Human-Machine Interface (HMI). The HMIl alerts the driver not to refuel during the daylight hours, not to idle too much while in traffic and if the vehicle has Evap leaks, it alerts th...