Browse Prior Art Database

Method to initiate the removal of a virtual machine instance from the instance to be removed

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000240383D
Publication Date: 2015-Jan-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 30K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Described is a method to initiate the removal of a virtual machine instance from the instance to be removed.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Page 01 of 2

Method to initiate the removal of a virtual machine instance from the instance to be removed

A virtual machine (VM) is hosted by a hypervisor which, in a cloud environment, is managed by a cloud server. In order for a cloud user to delete the VM, they must log into the cloud server and issue a delete request that targets the specific VM.

    The drawback of this solution is that it requires the user to navigate to the cloud server UI, locate the correct VM, and then issue the delete. This becomes tedious and error prone in a large environment with multiple cloud servers, often causing the VM to not be prompted deleted.

    Another solution that ensures that cloud instances are deleted is having them auto-delete after a given period of time (i.e., time-out). The drawback of this solution is that it encourages a user to not manually remove VMs once they no longer need them, wasting resources until the VM eventually times out.

This disclosure describes a mechanism that makes the VM aware of the cloud service that is hosting it and how that cloud service uniquely identifies it. Once the VM is equipped with this information, then communication with the hosting cloud server can originate from the VM. For example, the information can be used to issue the delete request (or any other VM modification) by communicating directly with the cloud server and providing the current VM's specific identification information.

    The advantage of this solution is that it abstracts both the cloud server and the VM identification information, allowing the end user to run a single command on the VM in order to issue the removal request. Moreover, since the VM identification information is available, then the user does not have to locate their specific VM in a potentially long list of active VMs.

    The goal of this invention is to reduce the overhead involved in deleting a VM once the user no longer requires it to be active. Instead of logging into the appropriate cloud server and finding one specific VM, the user only needs to run a single command (or click a desktop button) on the VM in order to issue the delete. Most cloud servers have a set of REST APIs that allow for the modification of VMs (including requesting deletes). These APIs can be abstracted into a program that can be executed on the VM. For example, once the cloud server has created a new VM, then the following can occur:

Retrieve the unique identifier of the V...