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architecture for an air distribution system

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000240447D
Publication Date: 2015-Jan-30
Document File: 3 page(s) / 109K

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architecture for an air distribution system: IP.COM

Abstract

The main idea of the invented architecture for the air distribution system is the separation of the fresh air supply for the pressurized and un-pressurized compartments for normal operational case (both packs in operation).

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Architecture for an air distribution system

Abstract

The main idea of the invented architecture for the air distribution system is the separation of the fresh air supply for the pressurized and un-pressurized compartments for normal operational case (both packs in operation).

Freighter aircraft may have pressurized and un-pressurized compartments. The design of these aircrafts may request a fresh air supply for the pressurized and the un-pressurized (only ventilation) compartments. The "classical" air distribution system with parallel air supply duct to all compartments is not possible without additional devices due to variable pressure difference between "air manifold" (mixer) and un- pressurized compartments. Additional flow control devices would be needed to allow the controlled flow distribution to all compartments in all operating conditions (also in high altitudes).

A key objective is to minimize the amount of needed equipment's and to eliminate the additional flow control device for the un-pressurized compartment, because it requests complex software and hardware equipment. Also the safety aspects shall be considered to avoid the de-pressurization of the pressurized compartments in failure case.


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The main idea of the invented architecture for the air distribution system is the separation of the fresh air supply for the pressurized and un-pressurized compartments for normal operational case (both packs in operation). The invented architectures also fulfill the redundancy principle (requirements): in case pack 1 is failed the pack 2 takes over the fresh air supply for the pressurized compartments. The invented architectures for the air distribution system is possible to realize, if the needed flow amount for the pressurized and the un-pressurized compartment is comparable (both needed flow amounts can be provided from both packs without significant limitations).

Key principles (advantages) of the...