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STEAM EXPLOSION EQUIPMENT

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000240507D
Publication Date: 2015-Feb-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 15K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Bertil Stromberg: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Treatment of lignocellulosic materials, for example agricultural residues of stalks or such, grasses, forest and sawmill residues such as wood chips and sawdust, should be included in any discussion of future sources of energy (fuels) and chemicals. Existing processes exist to begin the treatment of lignocellulosic materials in the conversion of lignocellulosic materials of all kinds to fuels and chemicals. One existing process to be considered is steam explosion.

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STEAM EXPLOSION EQUIPMENT

Treatment of lignocellulosic materials, for example agricultural residues of stalks or such, grasses, forest and sawmill residues such as wood chips and sawdust, should be included in any discussion of future sources of energy (fuels) and chemicals.  Existing processes exist to begin the treatment of lignocellulosic materials in the conversion of lignocellulosic materials of all kinds to fuels and chemicals.   One existing process to be considered is steam explosion.  Steam explosion is a process where the lignocellulosic material is treated as first step to break down its three main components of lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose by exposing the lignocellulosic material at an elevated pressure to saturated water or steam for a period of time, and then quickly or suddenly releasing the pressure. An acid, ammonia, alkali or other catalyst may be added to aid in breaking down the lignocellulosic material. As a result of the sudden release of pressure the lignocellulosic material is effectively exploded into smaller particles with an increased specific surface are making them more accessible to downstream treatments.

Steam explosion typically involves a pressurized vessel where the lignocellulosic material is subjected to elevated pressure and saturated water or steam.  In many applications this pressurized vessel has a horizontal, relative to the ground, orientation.  Such an orientation may not be truly horizontal, but rather be at an angle,...