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Methane Smart App Detector

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000240616D
Publication Date: 2015-Feb-12
Document File: 1 page(s) / 23K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Breathalyzers are commonly used and now are included in devices which detect simple classes of alcohols. This is done through a tin oxide sensor in the detector. These devices have now been transformed to be utilized into smart applications through hand held devices. What has further been accomplished is that diabetics who breathe acetone C3H6O can also breathe into a breathalyzer (for 10 seconds) in order to gauge and relate their glucose levels. Alternatively, a rock formation breathes as well while drilling. As a drill bit passes through the rock, CH4, methane, the primary culprit in kicks could be detectable as well. This same sensor (either directly or through a smart app device) can gauge methane, a simpler compound than that of alcohol. If a sensor can pick up methane levels at the bit or close to it, these data can be relayed back to surface in advance of a kick resulting in mitigation procedures for the well. This would thereby prevent lost time due to circulation in the well and extended rig down time. As stated, this has been done using a smart app in a handheld device to check for alcohol. It requires that the user exhale into the device for 10 seconds. A rock formation exhales in the same manner as it is drilled through, If simple alcohols are detectable through such a device, a much lighter compound, methane (CH4), which is attributed to pore pressure abnormalities while drilling should be detectable as well.

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SMP4-58952-US

Title:  Methane Smart App Detector

Abstract:  Breathalyzers are commonly used and now are included in devices which detect simple classes of alcohols.  This is done through a tin oxide sensor in the detector.  These devices have now been transformed to be utilized into smart applications through hand held devices.   What has further been accomplished is that diabetics who breathe acetone C3H6O can also breathe into a breathalyzer (for  10 seconds) in order to gauge and relate their glucose levels.  Alternatively, a rock formation breathes as well while drilling.  As a drill bit passes through the rock, CH4, methane, the primary culprit in kicks could be detectable as well.  This same sensor (either directly or through a smart app device) can gauge methane, a simpler compound than that of alcohol.  If a sensor can pick up methane levels at the bit or close to it, these data can be relayed back to surface in advance of a kick resulting in mitigation procedures for the well.  This would thereby prevent lost time due to circulation in the well and extended rig down time.  As stated, this has been done using a smart app in a handheld device to check for alcohol.  It requires that the user exhale into the device for 10 seconds.  A rock formation exhales in the same manner as it is drilled through,  If simple alcohols are detectable through such a device, a much lighter compound, methane (CH4), which is attributed to pore pressure abnormalities while d...