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System and Method to Detect Question in Communications and Preemptive Answering

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000240790D
Publication Date: 2015-Mar-02
Document File: 3 page(s) / 69K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a system that automatically detects inquiries in synchronous and asynchronous electronic communications and attempts to find answers without requiring action on the part of the recipient.

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System and Method to Detect Question in Communications and Preemptive Answering

When a question is posed from one electronic media user to another (e.g., via smart phone, text message, email, world wide web post, etc.) a method is needed to provide an answer in a timely manner, without requiring the recipient to perform searches before replying or causing the sender to wait a long time for an answer .

The novel contribution is a system that automatically detects inquiries and attempts to find answers without requiring action on the part of the recipient . In the case of asynchronous communication (i.e. email, text) the answer is made ready for the recipient to review and incorporate it into a response. In synchronous communication, the system can display an answer to a question, verbally directed to a user via a phone conversation, on screen (e.g., wearable technology, phone screen, etc.).

The core idea is a system that monitors users' electronic communications, captures the incoming questions, and then prepares an answer for the intercepted question . During synchronous communication, the system attempts to answer the question when it is asked. While texting, an answer appears to a texted question (perhaps the answer appears in red, to distinguish it from human entered text). During a phone conversation, a popup with an answer appears on a screen. During asynchronous communication, the system attempts to answer the question before the communication is read or heard. An email that the user has not yet read is annotated with the answer to a question asked by the sender. A voicemail that has not yet been heard is annotated with an audio answer to the caller's question.

Examples of communications supported by various embodiments include , but not are not limited to, email, short messaging systems (SMS), voicemail, phone calls, instant messaging (IM), conference calls, and e-meetings.

The party that receives the answer is the party for which the system was deployed . For instance, a customer sends a sales representative an email with the question : "And

what is this new feature I keep hearing about?" If this system is deployed as an email agent in the company, the answer appears in the email receiver's (i.e. the sales representative's) mail file; the user inquiring (i.e. the customer that sent the email) does not see this answer unless the representative sends it.

Similarly, during a phone conversation, a sales representative with this system deployed on an associated phone is asked by a customer : "Are you free to meet Thursday morning?" Again, the answer appears on the sales representative's phone on which the system is deployed and is able to access and read the user's calendar . In this case, the fact that question is answered only for the party for whom the system is deployed is an important privacy requirement.

The party for which the application was deployed may also ask questions . The system provides answers to those questio...