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MICROORGANISMS AND METHODS FOR PRODUCTION OF SPECIFIC LENGTH FATTY ALCOHOLS AND RELATED COMPOUNDS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000240903D
Publication Date: 2015-Mar-11
Document File: 238 page(s) / 3M

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Tim Torchia: CONTACT

Related Documents

W0564 Supplementary File: IP.COM [+2]

Abstract

The invention provides non-naturally occurring microbial organisms containing a fatty alcohol, fatty aldehyde or fatty acid pathway, wherein the microbial organisms selectively produce a fatty alcohol, fatty aldehyde or fatty acid of a specified length. Also provided are non-naturally occurring microbial organisms having a fatty alcohol, fatty aldehyde or fatty acid pathway, wherein the microbial organisms further include an acetyl- CoA pathway. In some aspects, the microbial organisms of the invention have select gene disruptions or enzyme attenuations that increase production of fatty alcohols, fatty aldehydes or fatty acids. The invention additionally provides methods of using the above microbial organisms to produce a fatty alcohol, a fatty aldehyde or a fatty acid.

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    MICROORGANISMS AND METHODS FOR PRODUCTION OF SPECIFIC LENGTH FATTY ALCOHOLS AND RELATED COMPOUNDS

     Compared to previous publications this document (including the attached Supplementary File with Tabs A-I) includes additional gene classes and candidates for transformations catalyzed by enoyl-CoA reductases, thiolases and elongases for pathways to make fatty alcohols (and their

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derivatives) described in this document. The attached Supplementary File, an Excel document, contains several tabs (sheets) describing the additional gene classes and candidates for the transformations described herein. Sequences can be accessed from public sources, e.g. KEGG, UniProt, using the gene designations provided in the Supplementary File. Figures are at the end of this document.

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     Tabs A-E of the Supplementary File provide additional enoyl-CoA reductases of EC classes
1.3.1 and 1.3.8 useful for the enoyl-CoA reductases in Step D of Figures 1 and 6.

     Tabs F-I of the Supplementary File provide additional thiolases and elongases of EC class
2.3.1 useful for the thiolase and elongase function to combine acetyl-CoA, propionyl-CoA or malonyl-CoA with another acyl-CoA molecule, as shown in Steps A and O of Figure 1 and Steps A

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and E of Figure 6.

    This application claims the benefit of priority of United States Provisional application serial No. 61/714,144, filed October 15, 2012, the entire contents of which is incorporated herein by reference.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

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    The present invention relates generally to biosynthetic processes, and more specifically to organisms having specific length fatty alcohol, fatty aldehyde or fatty acid biosynthetic capacity.

    Primary alcohols are a product class of compounds having a variety of industrial applications which include a variety of biofuels and specialty chemicals. Primary alcohols

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also can be used to make a large number of additional industrial products including polymers and surfactants. For example, higher primary alcohols, also known as fatty alcohols (C4-C24) and their ethoxylates are used as surfactants in many consumer detergents, cleaning products and personal care products worldwide such as laundry powders and liquids, dishwashing liquid and hard surface cleaners. They are also used in the manufacture of a variety of

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industrial chemicals and in lubricating oil additives. Specific length fatty alcohols, such as


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octanol and hexanol, have useful organoleptic properties and have long been employed as fragrance and flavor materials. Smaller chain length C4-C8 alcohols (e.g., butanol) are used as chemical intermediates for production of derivatives such as acrylates used in paints, coatings, and adhesives applications.

Fatty alcohols are currently produced from, for example, hydrogenation of fatty acids,

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hydroformylation of terminal olefins, partial oxidation of n-paraffins and the Al- catalyzed polymerization of ethylene. Unfortunately, it is not commercially viable to pr...