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Friction break rotating linear motor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000241284D
Publication Date: 2015-Apr-13
Document File: 1 page(s) / 15K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The idea is that an electrically driven linear motor (or extension of it) should be made to rotate. This rotating action will relieve the static force or friction of seated seals. When pressure remains on a set of seals or seat, the friction required to unseat the seat (or unseal the seals) will/can be high. Our current Linear motor design only travels in one linear direction which would require that extensive force. But if the design is enhanced to be able to rotate such as with the assistance of dogs or pegs, then the linear motor (or extension of it) can rotate sufficiently to keep the force from locking the seat and seal. To utilize a rotational force all that a linear motor would need is a slot to ride along in order to cause that translating cylinder to rotate as it travels in a linear direction. That slight rotation of cylinder or carrier sleeve is enough to cause a torque so that the item, such as a ball in a barrier valve, could begin the movement. If the translating cylinder that contacts the ball or sleeve that exposes port(s) could slightly rotate, then the force that is required to unseat the closed mechanism can be more effective. Traditional rotating electric motors with use of a worm screw mechanism can provide high amount of force, but rotating motors do not apply to safety valves or barriers or even sliding sleeves due to nature of the rotating motor (fails in ‘as is’ condition), its speed, and its size, etc. This is not the case with the linear motor concept. The application for linear motors should be made to fit anywhere that rotational motors are utilized and if enough force could be transferred, may replace the rotational motor and convert to the new linear motor. The issue with rotational motors other than size and other output limitations is the lack of the ability to return to an initial position when a loss of supply power/control occurs; Linear motors can return to initial position with loss of power. Currently, if we were to employ a linear motor to unseat a large area or a ball, the force required to do so will be significantly higher than the force required by a rotated action. That same motion/movement can thereafter travel linearly. Electric Barrier valves might become enhanced to incorporate a linear motor that will travel down to cycle open a ball (or expose a port such as in a sliding sleeve). The application of this concept could be widespread as electric capability is a growing niche and old products will need to be adapted to the new niche. Rotating linear motor might assist in this effort.

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Friction break rotating linear motor

The idea is that an electrically driven linear motor (or extension of it) should be made to rotate. This rotating action will relieve the static force or friction of seated seals. When pressure remains on a set of seals or seat, the friction required to unseat the seat (or unseal the seals) will/can be high.  Our current Linear motor design only travels in one linear direction which would require that extensive force. But if the design is enhanced to be able to rotate such as with the assistance of dogs or pegs, then the linear motor (or extension of it) can rotate sufficiently to keep the force from locking the seat and seal.

To utilize a rotational force all that a linear motor would need is a slot to ride along in order to cause that translating cylinder to rotate as it travels in a linear direction. That slight rotation of cylinder or carrier sleeve is enough to cause a torque so that the item, such as a ball in a barrier valve, could begin the movement. If the translating cylinder that contacts the ball or sleeve that exposes port(s) could slightly rotate, then the force that is required to unseat the closed mechanism can be more effective. Traditional rotating electric motors with use of a worm screw mechanism can provide high amount of force, but rotating motors do not apply to safety valves or barriers or even sliding sleeves due to nature of the rotating motor (fails in ‘as is’ condition), its speed, and its size, etc. This...