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Preparation of Ultra-thin Multilayer Polymeric Structures for Spatial Resolution Verification

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000241416D
Publication Date: 2015-Apr-24
Document File: 4 page(s) / 977K

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The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Bao Peite: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A method of preparing an ultra-thin multilayer polymeric structure is established. With such method, layers down to 50 – 100 nm thickness, which is comparable to the resolution of the AFM-IR and controllable compositions, can be prepared. Thus, it has not only enabled pre-collection of the IR spectrums of each component, but also ensured sufficient contrast in AFM phase images due to the difference in modulus. When characterizing with AFM combined with the IR, it would be easy to observe the photothermal-induced resonance effect and compare the AFM-IR results with that solely by AFM.

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Preparation of Ultra-thin Multilayer Polymeric Structure for Spatial Resolution Verification

Abstract: A method of preparing an ultra-thin multilayer polymeric structure is established. With such method, layers with down to 50 - 100 nm thickness, which is comparable to the resolution of the AFM-IR, and controllable compositions, can be prepared. Thus, it has not only enabled pre-collection of the IR spectrums of each component, but also ensured sufficient contrast in AFM phase images due to the difference in modulus. When characterizing with AFM combined with the IR, it would be easy to observe the photothermal-induced resonance effect and compare the AFM-IR results with that solely by AFM.

Background:
Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is a powerful technique that has been employed extensively for characterizing polymeric materials, which provides qualitative and quantitative information about particular functional groups and molecules. However, one limitation of the IR spectroscopy or IR microscopy is its limited spatial resolution, which is generally controlled by its diffraction limit and geometrical apertures of the instrument. Some technologies advance the IR source or detectors in order to improve the spatial resolution but none of them can reach a sub-micron scale. This limits the application of IR spectroscopy in the understanding of a composition and its phases in sub-micron sized dispersed particles in a continuous matrix, which can impact greatly the physical properties of the material.

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