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USING GRAPH TECHNOLOGY TO DETERMINE NETWORK FAILURES BETWEEN STORAGE SYSTEMS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000241657D
Publication Date: 2015-May-20
Document File: 1 page(s) / 61K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Using graph technology to determine network failures between storage systems

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USING GRAPH TECHNOLOGY TO DETERMINE NETWORK FAILURES BETWEEN STORAGE SYSTEMS

When a storage controller reports a previously logged in fibre channel connection has been unexpectedly logged out, it is often difficult to determine why the connection has been lost. The system is able to report which port the error has come from, but not if it is a port fault, cable fault or an issue with the remote device it is connected to. The storage administrator needs to login to the remote devices and check the physical port and cable connections. Checking this manually can take a lot of time and effort, often the administrator is not in the same location as there storage system.

    The storage system will use graph technology to help determine the cause of the fibre channel port connection fault. The graph will represent all fibre channel connectivity, allowing it to be analysed for multiple connection faults, suggesting the connected device is the problem, not the port or single connection.

    A non directional graph will be used to represent all fibre channel ports and the connections in a storage system. A fibre channel switch will only be represented by one vertex, not a vertex for each port on the switch. Each fibre channel port will be represented by a vertex, vertices will be grouped by worldwide node name, each fibre channel connection between ports will be represented by an edge.

Each time a login is added or removed, the storage controller will create a graph of the curre...