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Subsurface Safety Valve with Smart Feedback

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000241687D
Publication Date: 2015-May-21
Document File: 1 page(s) / 14K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A subsurface safety valve with the necessary sensors and intelligence built-in could provide substantial feedback to the operator. This information could allow for predictable application of preventative maintenance without causing unnecessary non-productive time A subsurface safety valve with the necessary sensors and intelligence built-in could provide substantial feedback to the operator. With only time and flow tube position, not only would the operator know if the valve was fully open and operational, but could also track velocity in order to perform preventative maintenance before problems could occur. For wells with asphaltene, paraffin, hydrates, or scale problems, this could reduce unnecessary treatments and improve the effectiveness when treatments are used. For treatments that cause formation damage, this would be even more beneficial. Immediate intervention could be used if anomalies were found, before it potentially became a safety or production risk. With additional inputs such as temperature and/or pressure, even more beneficial information could be gleaned to predict which kinds of materials could have formed in the particular well environment so the remedy could be tailored to the problem more accurately. Control pressure would help to understand if a valve began responding more slowly than it should. Counters could track the number of cycles performed and even the number of times the valve failed to open fully. Date and timestamps would also be helpful additions to the valve’s history for diagnosis if any issues were to occur. Currently, operator logs are the best resource we have and aren’t always available or sufficient for post-failure diagnoses. The combined history of many sensors could provide a more complete picture of the valve’s life. For the long term, accumulated knowledge could help better predict the life of a safety valve in certain conditions. Current services may be adequate for the communications of this data to the operator. All sensors should be incorporated without interfering with the current fail-safe nature of the valve. This idea would be most beneficial in deep water or other cases where intervention and non-productive time are particularly expensive. The communication method from the valve to the operator could be electronic and wired, electronic and wireless, conveyed through pulses, or any communication method known to those of skill in the art. The data could be processed at the valve or at the surface

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Subsurface Safety Valve with Smart Feedback

A subsurface safety valve with the necessary sensors and intelligence built-in could provide substantial feedback to the operator. This information could allow for predictable application of preventative maintenance without causing unnecessary non-productive time

A subsurface safety valve with the necessary sensors and intelligence built-in could provide substantial feedback to the operator. With only time and flow tube position, not only would the operator know if the valve was fully open and operational, but could also track velocity in order to perform preventative maintenance before problems could occur. For wells with asphaltene, paraffin, hydrates, or scale problems, this could reduce unnecessary treatments and improve the effectiveness when treatments are used. For treatments that cause formation damage, this would be even more beneficial. Immediate intervention could be used if anomalies were found, before it potentially became a safety or production risk. With additional inputs such as temperature and/or pressure, even more beneficial information could be gleaned to predict which kinds of materials could have formed in the particular well environment so the remedy could be tailored to the problem more accurately. Control pressure would help to understand if a valve began responding more slowly than it should. Counters could track the number of cycles performed and even the number of times the valve failed to open fully. Da...