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Heat recovery in liquid pre-treatment, pre-concentration and drying systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000241813D
Publication Date: 2015-Jun-02

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The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Rikke Aavang Andersen: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This document describes a row of technologies for recovering heat during the processes for drying liquid feeds, pastes and solids, and for pre-concentration of the feeds prior to drying. The technologies de-scribed in this document may be used and combined in all possible ways for all products within dairy, food, chemical, agro-chemical, energy, biotechnology, pharmaceutical, healthcare and many more, and are not limited in application to the examples given but are wide open for all such products.

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Page 01 of 21

GEA PROCESS ENGINEERING A/S

Heat recovery in liquid pre-treatment, pre- concentration and drying systems

Rikke Aavang Andersen

5/27/2015

This document describes a row of technologies for recovering heat during the processes for drying liq- uid feeds, pastes and solids, and for pre-concentration of the feeds prior to drying. The technologies de- scribed in this document may be used and combined in all possible ways for all products within dairy, food, chemical, agro-chemical, energy, biotechnology, pharmaceutical, healthcare and many more, and are not limited in application to the examples given but are wide open for all such products.

© GEA Process Engineering A/S



Page 02 of 21

1 Introduction

This document describes a row of technologies for recovering heat during the processes for drying liquid feeds, pastes and solids, and for pre-concentration of the feeds prior to drying. The technologies de- scribed in this document may be used and combined in all possible ways for all products within dairy, food, chemical, agro-chemical, energy, biotechnology, pharmaceutical, healthcare and many more, and are not limited in application to the examples given but are wide open for all such products.

In the bibliography you will find a list of references which is a basis for and/or a supplement to this arti- cle. These references shall be considered an integrated part of this document to be incorporated by ref- erence.

Throughout this document the terms "gas" will refer to an inert gas (or mixture), such as e.g. nitrogen or superheated steam, as well as air.


1.1 Drying systems

Spray drying is the most widely used industrial process involving particle formation and drying. It is high- ly suited for the continuous production of dry solids in either powder, granulate or agglomerate form from liquid feed stocks as solutions, emulsions and pumpable suspensions. Therefore, spray drying is an ideal process where the end-product must comply with precise quality standards regarding particle size distribution, residual moisture content, bulk density, and particle shape.

Spray drying involves the atomization of a liquid feedstock into a spray of droplets and contacting the droplets with hot air in a drying chamber. The sprays are produced by either rotary (wheel) or nozzle atomizers. Evaporation of moisture from the droplets and formation of dry particles proceed under con- trolled temperature and airflow conditions. Powder is discharged continuously from the drying chamber. Operating conditions and dryer design are selected according to the drying characteristics of the product and powder specification.

Every spray dryer consists of feed pump, atomizer, supply fan, air heater, air disperser, drying chamber, and systems for exhaust air cleaning are combined into a system that meets individual operational safe- ty, environmental protection, heat recovery, and powder recovery. All systems can be provided with pre- and post-treatment equipment, for exampl...