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System and Method for Increasing Productivity via Task-Oriented Semantic Graphs

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000241826D
Publication Date: 2015-Jun-02
Document File: 3 page(s) / 189K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a system that monitors the user’s actions and behavior to detect and identify the task in which the user is involved, and then associates with the identified task all the resources utilized toward the completion of the task. The system maintains the task and the relationships to its associated resources in a queryable semantic graph.

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System and Method for Increasing Productivity via Task-Oriented Semantic Graphs

Completing a task involves utilizing various resources at different phases of the life cycle of the task. For example, an individual writing a paper about a certain topic might need to review multiple document types and resources in multiple locations. Some of these resources may be on the web, in the user's local machine, on the cloud, in the mail server, etc. As people are typically working on multiple tasks at the same time, and often certain tasks take priority over others, it is very important to keep track of all the resources utilized for the specific task. This is especially important in the event that a user must shift attention from one task to another or loses information or context due to a system failure. A system is needed in which a user can protect the context of an

active task through documentation, updates, searches, archiving, retrieval, etc. to avoid the loss of productivity associated with losing the context.

The novel solution is a system that monitors the user's actions and behavior to detect and identify the task in which the user is involved, and then associates with the identified task all the resources utilized toward the completion of the task. The system maintains the task and the relationships to its associated resources in a semantic graph. The semantic graph is not bounded by a specific schema; therefore, it is flexible to accommodate new tasks and resources during the course of the task.

The semantic graph not only includes actions one takes to accomplish the task, but also the task and associated resources. For example, if the user's task is to plan a ski trip, then the knowledge graph for this task includes all the resources the user viewed related to the task, as well as the actions the user took to accomplish the task (e.g., booking the hotel, rating the quality of hotel accommodations, etc.).

The knowledge graph for a specific task can be shared with others, and the knowledge graphs can be rated by others relative to the quality of resources and effectiveness in helping to accomplish the task. This allows people to select the highest rated knowledge graphs, learn from the experts, and follow the experts' successful approaches to completing certain tasks.

Another use for knowledge graph is for computer crash recovery. For example, a user is working on a conference presentation and has the following seven resources opened:


• A text document that details his presentation content


• A presentation file that shows the graphics needed


• A web browser that shows the agenda of the conference


• An email to which the user needs to respond regarding the meeting


• A social network page that shows a discussion of topic related to the

  presentation
• A web page of the hotel


• A map on a mobile device that shows the location of the hotel

If a system failure occurs (e.g., the user's computer crashes) at this point, mos...