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Power Management for Multiple Sensors, Applications, and Devices

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000241935D
Publication Date: 2015-Jun-09
Document File: 3 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed are a method and system to determine the roles and relationships between the power consumers contained within mobile and wearable devices, and then determine a subset of the power consumers that is necessary to activate other power consumers to serve the user's needs. The system automatically enables sensors, applications, and devices to serve a user's needs whenever appropriate, without the user performing a directive action.

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Power Management for Multiple Sensors , Applications, and Devices

An individual may use one or more mobile and wearable devices at the same time. Each of these devices also has many sensors, functions, and applications. For example, a smart phone typically has a light sensor, flashlight, camera, Global Positioning System (GPS), Bluetooth*, accelerometer, Wi-Fi sensor, Wi-Fi connection, mobile data connection, and many applications/daemons running. The same user might also have a smart watch that monitors the heart rate and blood pressure and acts as pedometer. The user might not need all of these applications and at the same time. These sensors, devices, and application consume additional power when enabled (i.e. each is a power consumer). Some are needed only in the gym; some are not needed when the user is at work or sleeping.

Typically, the user manually enables and disables these power consumers. Devices also utilize mechanisms for simple association to enable and disable these power consumers. For example, when Google Map* is started, it automatically enables the GPS, when the Wi-Fi sensor determines that Wi-Fi is available, it turns off the mobile data connection and enables the Wi-Fi connection. In addition, as these elements and components consume power, usability of the device is reduces as recharging demands increase. These mechanisms run in a much narrower scope, and do not manage all the power consumers and user's desire in a more holistic way.

In an autonomic environment, it is desirable that these sensors, applications, and devices serve user's needs whenever appropriate, and without the user performing an action.

The novel solution is a method and system to determine the roles and relationships between the power consumers contained within mobile and wearable devices, and then determine a subset of the power consumers that is necessary to activate other power consumers to serve the user's needs.

The method associates the power consumers to use cases (e.g., a heart rate monitor to a user jogging on a treadmill). With each use case associated with the device user, the system generates criteria (e.g., user is at the gym) that determine the onset of a use case (e.g., user is planning to jog). For all the criteria, the system determines the required inputs (e.g., GPS location, pedometer) to evaluate the criteria (e.g., user at the gym). For each input, the system determines the computing resources (i.e. power consumers) necessary to fulfill the input, such as the GPS component, heart rate sensor, or a software application). The system also identifies alternatives to the computing resources. Finally, the system determines the lowest common denominator between all the necessary power consumers, while satisfying all required use cases.

To implement the method and system in a preferred embodiment:

1. Determine use cases for a user, given a list of sensors, applications and devices A. Determine a possible list of activities b...