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For resource constrained cloud environments, leverage a network packet analyzer to monitor incoming user requests in order to identify virtual machines which can be “suspended” or should be “resumed”.

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000242014D
Publication Date: 2015-Jun-15
Document File: 2 page(s) / 144K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A system and method for leveraging a network packet analyzer to monitor incoming user requests in order to identify virtual machines which can be “suspended” or should be “resumed” for resource constrained cloud environments is disclosed.

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For resource constrained cloud environments, leverage a network packet analyzer to monitor incoming user requests in order to identify virtual machines which can be "suspended" or should be "resumed".

Disclosed is a system and method for leveraging a network packet analyzer to monitor incoming user requests in order to identify virtual machines which can be "suspended" or should be "resumed" for resource constrained cloud environments.

Due to lack of adequate capacity planning or budgetary reasons many cloud environments experience resource constraints which manifest themselves as both performance bottlenecks and inhibitors to deploying new virtual machines. In reality, many of these cloud environments have plenty of idle virtual machines, particularly

when those virtual machines sole purpose is to support end user requests. The cloud computing industry lacks a solution which monitors selected virtual machines in the cloud at predetermined intervals looking for incoming user requests. The user request monitoring would be done at the TCP/IP network layer using a packet analyzer. If there

were no user requests in the predetermined interval (based on policies) then the solution would place the virtual machine into a 'suspended' state. When a virtual machine is in the 'suspended' state, its memory contents would be flushed to disk and its resources released. When a new user request arrives for a virtual machine which is in the 'suspended' state, the solution would 'resume' the virtual machine assuming adequate resources are available. So in essence, all the user has to do is attempt to use the virtual machine and it will be resumed.

Consider a cloud environment supporting developers. Each developer has a dedicated virtual ma...