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User Interface Consistency Enhancement Method

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000242038D
Publication Date: 2015-Jun-15
Document File: 3 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method to increase the usability of a user interface (UI). The method utilizes enabling technology to collect raw data in terms of how the user interacts with the UI, and then derives a centralized color palette that can map the colors based on user's psychology convention.

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User Interface Consistency Enhancement Method

The World Wide Web (WWW) is a commonly used communication platform. Even though there are general design guidelines and conventions to follow, people may still render different widgets on the user interface using special rules. Sometimes the user interface has a nice appearance, but the inconsistency on the user interface prevents the users from achieving goals.

Interference can take several different forms; some are worse than others are, some are related to irregularities, while others are related to contradictions, and still others are related to both. Both contradictions and irregularities prevent users from transferring knowledge from past experiences, which forces the users to learn new stimuli/usage pairs that are specific to a particular user interface (UI) element.

Color is the most powerful cue to coherence and connection, both within a page and across pages within a site. Thus, designers need to take special caution when selecting colors for UI designs. Users see color first and attempt to derive a meaningful grouping from similarly colored elements, whether or not the designer intends it. Links need to stand out not only from the background but also from the surrounding text. If the font color is black and the link color is black, this is not user-friendly.

Existing technology allows the user to change the link colors through web browser preference settings. However, the Cascading Style Sheet (CSS) styling that applied to the code can overwrite the colors defined in the browser setting. Sometimes, the user interface may be applied with different themes. If the colors used in the themes are not easy to understand, then it still does not help user's needs.

Figure 1: Typical user preference settings in a Web browser

Sometimes people use different icons to represent the same concept, or use same icon for different concepts, which can also be very confusing.

The method disclosed herein utilizes enabling technology to collect the raw data in terms of how the user interacts with the UI, and then derives a centralized color palette that can map the colors based on user's psychology convention. This is different from allowing the user to manually change the colors on the user interface.

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The method may be implemented as a thin layer installed on top of the browser. The user can enable or disable this plugin it at any time.

The following provide additional details regarding the above described method and system:

1. System utilizes existing art to capture the eye gaze area, target information 2. System collects the user interaction behavior and keeps all the data in a log 3. System keeps track of how the user interacts with the UI widget (e.g., Does the user spend more time on eye gazing certain colors that is used for certain text/links?)


4. System collects the data in terms of:

A. When the user knows which link is clickable and the color used for the links on the UI

B...