Browse Prior Art Database

Portable Computer Security using Music Methods

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000242090D
Publication Date: 2015-Jun-18
Document File: 2 page(s) / 26K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method to enhance laptop security user authentication by supplementing an electronic signature with stored ranges of force, duration, and timing of computer keyboard keystrokes; the input emulates playing a piano. The method also applies a user’s device for storing and playing music as an external authentication token.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 51% of the total text.

Page 01 of 2

Portable Computer Security using Music Methods

A method is needed to improve laptop security, especially in the event that a user may be observed by a third party.

The novel contribution is a method to enhance laptop security user authentication by supplementing an electronic signature with stored ranges of force, duration, and timing of computer keyboard keystrokes; the input emulates playing a piano. The method also applies a user's device for storing and playing music as an external authentication token.

Basic music keyboarding techniques include how to vary the force applied to a key, the duration of force (e.g., quarter note), the timing (metronome tempo), and elementary sight-reading. The novel method equips a laptop computer with a keyboard sensitive to these measures to provide addition encryption to a typed password. The user enters the password phrase with the correct key force, duration, and timing to match the exemplar recorded in the authentication set-up phase. Such a password entry is more difficult for a third party to observe.

Recalling a few musical phrases and keyboard those phrases is an easy task, especially if one occasionally practices with some of the less sophisticated simulated piano tools for handheld devices or tablets. In the implementation, the sounds cannot be heard through the speakers for feedback (though this could be enabled if the headphones are enabled).

The implementation of this might not add cost beyond what would otherwise be needed for a universal serial bus (USB) secu...