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Method and System for Using Solid State Drive’s (SSD) Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM) Media for Cashing Persistent Data

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000242239D
Publication Date: 2015-Jun-26
Document File: 3 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A method and system is disclosed for using solid state drive’s (SSD) dynamic random access memory (DRAM) media for cashing persistent data.

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Method and System for Using Solid State Drive's (SSD) Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM) Media for Cashing Persistent Data
Most computing systems use cache for accelerating IO operations. Some systems use cache for transient data only, some use cache for persistent data only, and some systems use cache for both transient and persistent data. The latter systems may use a single cache device for both transient and persistent data, or two separate cache devices - one for transient data and one for persistent data. The most common cache device uses a dynamic random access memory (DRAM) media, and hence it is a volatile memory device and loses its data upon an unexpected power loss. The common solution to the risk of data loss is using some kind of power storage device (battery) that provides enough electric power to keep the volatile DRAM alive while copying the date from the volatile DRAM to a nonvolatile device such as an solid state drive (SSD) or an HDD. The drawback of battery usage is that it is a consumable component and hence very expensive. The solution of a battery is very complex as the computing system needs to detect power losses, to copy the data from the volatile memory device to a special nonvolatile memory device and back when the power returns.

Disclosed is a method and system for using SSD DRAM media for cashing persistent data. The method and system utilizes SSD's DRAM to cache the data that is required to be preserved across power failures. The data that is required to be preserved can be such as, but not limited to, write commands, metadata and system states. The SSD's DRAM nonvolatile device provides substantially no risk of data loss in case of power loss. Further, portions of the SSD's DRAM are used as the computing system's persistent cache or alternatively SSDs are configured to have a larger DRAM so as to allow caching of the system's persi...