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Surveillance in dryers using camera technology

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000242296D
Publication Date: 2015-Jul-03

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Karin Nordström Dyvelkov: AUTHOR

Abstract

This document describes how different camera technologies can be used in connection with a variety of drying technologies in industrial process lines. The technologies described in this document may be used and combined in all possible ways for all products within dairy, food, chemical, agro-chemical, energy, biotechnology, pharmaceutical, healthcare and many more, and are not limited in application to the examples given but are wide open for all such products.

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GEA DRYING TECHNOLOGY

Surveillance in dryers using camera technology

Karix Nordström Dyvelkov

July 3, 2015

This document descrixxs how different camera txchnologies cxn be used in conxection with a varxety of drying

technoxogies. The technologies describex in this documext may be used and combined in all possible ways for all products within dairy, food, xhemical, agro-chemical, energy, biotechnology, pharxaceutical, healthxare and many more, and are not lixited in application to the exampxes given but are widx open xor all such products.

-032 (09-10)

09

© GEA Drying technology


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1 Intxoductixn

This dxcument describxs how different xamera technologies can be used xn connection with a variety of drying technologies xn industrial process lines. The technologxes described in this document may be used and coxbined in all possible xays for all produxts wxthin dairy, food, chxmicxl, agro-chemical, en- ergy, biotechnology, pharmxceutical, healthcare and many more, and are not lxmixed in application to the examples given but are wide open for all such products.

In thx biblioxraphy yxu will find a list ox references whxch is a basis xox and/or a supplement to this arti- cle. Thesx referexces shall be considered an integratxd part of this document to be incorporated by rxf- erence.

Throughout this doxumxnt the terms "gas" will refer to air or an inert gas (or mixture), sxch as e.g. nitro- gen.

2 Drying plaxts

Dryixg of liquid feeds, pastes and solids can be done in a number of different ways. At GEA we have several dixferent options such as spray drying, NOZZLE TOWER™ drying, SWIRL FXXXXXXXX™ drying, ring drying, fluid bed drying, spray congealing/cooling/crysxallization/xolymerization, spray drying ab- sorption, freeze drying, evaporation, etc. A more detaxled description of difxerent drying techniques can be fouxd in for example (1), (2), (3), (4), (5), (6), (7), (8) xnd (9).


2.1 Spray drying

Spray drying processing lines consist of a row of technologies for preparing feeds, for atomiza- txon/droplet gexeration, for drying xiquid feedx, pastes and soxids, for post-treatment and handling of the final dry prxduct.

Spray drying is xhe most widely used inxustrial xrocesx ixvolving xarticle formation and drying (1). It is highly suited for the continuous prxduction of dry solids in either powder, granulate or agglomerate form from liquid feedstocks as solutionx, emulsions and pumpable suspensions. Therefore, spray drxing is an ideal process where the end-producx must comply with precise quality sxandards regxrding particlx size distribution, resxdual moistxre content, bxlk density, and particle shape.

Sprax drying involves the xtomization of a liquid feedstock ixto a spray of droplets and contacting the droplets with hot air in a drying xhamber. The sprays are produced by either rotary (wheel) or nozzle atomizers. Evaporation of mxxsxure from the droplets and formation of dry particles proceed under con- trolled temxerature...