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Welder with simplified electronics

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000242302D
Publication Date: 2015-Jul-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

This invention simplifies the components in the welding/cutting machine and builds upon the premise that only one type of power is required at a time.

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  1. Title of the invention:

Welder with simplified electronics

  1. Inventor(s):

Ed Enyedy

Andy Meckler

 

  1. Summary of what has been done before:

Existing engine powered welding and cutting equipment is designed to provide auxiliary power (50/60 Hz at 120, 240, or other common voltages) and DC or DC/AC power for welding and cutting. Regulations require that the weld and cutting power circuits be isolated from the auxiliary power.  This is done by having two separate stators or with separate windings within a single stator.

Smaller machines in the 10-30 hp range are frequently sold to contractors, farmer, and general repairmen.  The machines are used for back-up power during power outages or are mounted on trucks and trailers and towed to work sites.  The overall engine power is limited, so rarely is welding and cutting power required at the same time the auxiliary power is used. Some machines use a small inverter to create isolated auxiliary power, which is expensive because there are electronics for weld power plus electronics for the auxiliary power.

  1. Summary of the invention:

This invention simplifies the components in the welding/cutting machine and builds upon the premise that only one type of power is required at a time. With our design, there is one set of electronic switches to create the desired output wave form. 

In one variation, the waveform may be tailored for welding.  Such waveforms are well-known: pulse welding, CV welding, CC welding, STT, gouging, TIG, etc.  The waveform may be AC or DC.  In another variation, the waveform may be suitable for plasma cutting. In a third form, the waveform may be a 50, 60, or 400 Hz sine wave.  The key is that one set of electronics creates all the waveforms, reducing the number of components and cost.  For machines with generators, the stator and rotor design are simplified.

Different loads attach to the machine via a series of receptacles.  Ideally, only the receptacles that match the power being generated would be powered. This prevents the wrong voltage from being fed into the loads.

A load switch directs the power to the receptacles.  The load switch may be in the form of a manual switch thrown by an operator.  Feedback about the switch position is fed into a controller for the switching electronics, so the correct power is generated for the receptacles.  A variation...