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Spark or Laser induced Atomic Emission Spectroscopy/Spark Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000242363D
Publication Date: 2015-Jul-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The proposal concerns a spark induced atomic emission spectroscopy to investigate the chemical composition of downhole fluids. Downhole fluids can be drilling fluids (mud) or formation fluids drawn from the formation by a fluid sampling tool. An electrical discharge is used to decompose the chemical substances into the atomic state of the chemical elements. Due to the high energy put into the electrical discharge the elements emit light at very specific wavelengths. This is normally seen as the color of the spark and contains a spectrum of all the light frequency lines of the exited chemical elements. The light is guided through a window or a fiber into an optical spectrometer. In the spectrometer the wavelength lines can be dissolved and recorded. A comparison with known wavelength pattern of chemical elements can give information about the elements that are in the investigated fluids. The intensity of light in the individual wavelengths can give information about the amount of certain elements in the fluid. For example one could measure the content of carbon, sulfur or oxygen and draw consequently conclusion about chemical compositions containing these elements like CO2 or H2S. The system works quite similar with laser induced breakdown with the disadvantage, that today’s laser system are still too big to incorporate them into a downhole tool. However that may change in the future.

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SMP4-58968-US

Title:  Spark or Laser induced Atomic Emission Spectroscopy/Spark Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

Abstract:  The proposal concerns a spark induced atomic emission spectroscopy to investigate the chemical composition of downhole fluids.  Downhole fluids can be drilling fluids (mud) or formation fluids drawn from the formation by a fluid sampling tool.  An electrical discharge is used to decompose the chemical substances into the atomic state of the chemical elements.  Due to the high energy put into the electrical discharge the elements emit light at very specific wavelengths.  This is normally seen as the color of the spark and contains a spectrum of all the light frequency lines of the exited chemical elements.  The light is guided through a window or a fiber into an optical spectrometer.  In the spectrometer the wavelength lines can be dissolved and recorded.  A comparison with known wavelength pattern of chemical elements can give information about the elements that are in the investigated fluids.  The intensity of light in the individual wavelengths can give information about the amount of certain elements in the fluid.  For example one could measure the content of carbon, sulfur or oxygen and draw consequently conclusion about chemical compositions containing these elements like CO2 or H2S.  The system works quite similar with laser induced breakdown with the disadvantage, that today’s laser system are still too big to incorporate them into a downhole tool.  However that may change in the future.

Description:  The proposal concerns a spark induced atomic emission spectroscopy to investigate the chemical composition of downhole fluids.  Do...