Browse Prior Art Database

Offshore Wind-powered Subsea Production

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000242704D
Publication Date: 2015-Aug-05
Document File: 1 page(s) / 73K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The distance of subsea oil and gas tiebacks is limited technically by transmission, and economically by cost of transmission and control infrastructure. A solution could be local power and control designed and installed with the absolute minimum footprint possible. While several power generation technologies could be selected to power such an installation, floating offshore wind is cost-effective, proven power. Additionally, the substructure provides space and buoyancy for control hardware and energy storage, if required. Commercial-scale battery storage recently experienced a step-change in cost reduction and should be considered as a part of a Wind-PSP system.

This text was extracted from a Microsoft Word document.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Wind-Powered Subsea Production (Wind PSP)

Abstract: The distance of subsea oil and gas tiebacks is limited technically by transmission, and economically by cost of transmission and control infrastructure.  A solution could be local power and control designed and installed with the absolute minimum footprint possible.  While several power generation technologies could be selected to power such an installation, floating offshore wind is cost-effective, proven power.  Additionally, the substructure provides space and buoyancy for control hardware and energy storage, if required.  Commercial-scale battery storage recently experienced a step-change in cost reduction and should be considered as a part of a Wind-PSP system.

This researcher has identified local power and control as an enabling technology for subsea production and long-distance tiebacks in high-wind speed subarctic environments.  Wind PSP presents a common-sense opportunity for providing this local power and control, based on integration of several proven and developing technologies.  With over 8 GW of installed capacity globally, mostly in Europe, bottom-fixed offshore wind is proven technology.  The first commercial-scale floating offshore wind system was installed in 2009 by Statoil off the Norwegian coast.  The second was installed by the Seattle-based startup Principle Power off the Portuguese coast in 2012.  Both systems deployed turbines with rated capacity of 2 MW or greater, were heavily instrumente...