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XML streaming of process information from embedded runtime system using WebSocket

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000242759D
Publication Date: 2015-Aug-12
Document File: 1 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Eric Schauer: INVENTOR

Abstract

By using WebSocket instead of the commonly used web technology for visualizing process information acquired by an embedded runtime system, it becomes possible to use web browsers as visualization clients to spontaneously change information of embedded runtime systems.

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XML streaming of process information from embedded runtime system using WebSocket

 

Background

For visualization of current process information acquired by an embedded runtime system, mostly web technology based user interfaces are used, because this kind of devices works mostly in a head-less mode. HTTP has, because of its nature, the disadvantage to not allow for pushing information from the device acquiring the process information (server) to a web client (e.g. Web browser) visualizing the acquired process information. WebSocket protocol (RFC6455) provides a possibility to communicate in a bidirectional way between server and client.

The format of the information to be transferred should be stable and extensible to avoid frequent changes on embedded runtime system due to extensions and modifications.

 

Problem to be solved

To spontaneously exchange process information between an embedded runtime system and a web browser based visualization by using a XML based streaming protocol.

Problem:

-       No WebSocket server support for VxWorks embedded OS available

-       No streaming parser (e.g. SAX2 parser) support based on web sockets client implementation available

 

State of the Art

DE102009028051A1.

 

General Principle

Without requiring proprietary 3rd party software, it is possible to use web browsers as visualization clients for spontaneously changing information of embedded runtime systems. HTTP based data exchange follows request-response principles and does therefore not provide the...