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CT in Situ Cell

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000242910D
Publication Date: 2015-Aug-28
Document File: 7 page(s) / 881K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Compressed cells have been widely used in the lab to maintain the pressure for formation rocks or cement samples. The design of the compressed cell has to fulfill the unique requirement of each test experiment, such as its compatibility with the load frame machine, the portability to be carried to other tests and its size and weight to be fitted in various equipment. In the current manuscript, we discuss the compressed cell which is designed specifically for the X-ray CT scanning. The cell is designed to apply axial force and confining pressure onto a sample of 1-inch in diameter as well as provide the ability of passing X-rays with minimum loss. The cell has four ports, two to provide a confining pressure to the sample and two for axial load. The design of the confining body allows it to be made of aluminum so it can be X-rayed, but at the same time hold pressure and secures the top and bottom pistons to provide the axial force. Compared to the existing cells, this is a small and relatively light cell, allowing it to be used in several different types of X-ray machines. This type of cell can be used to look at formations under stress and fracture growth in laboratory conditions. Observing fractures under pressure is very important for accurately predicting the real fracture geometries, especially the fracture widths and lengths.

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CT xn Situ Cell

Abstract

Compressed cells have been widely used in the lab xo maintain the pressure for formation rocks or cement xxmples. The design of the compressed cxll has to fulfilx the unique requixement of each test experiment, such as its compatibilxty with the loax xrame machine, the portabilixy to be carried to other tests and its size and weight tx be fitted in various exuipment. In the current manxscript, we discusx the compressxd celx which is desixned specifically fox the X-ray CX scanning. The cell xs desixned to applx axial forcx and confining pressure onto a sample of 1-ixch in xixmeter xs well as provxde the ability ox passing X-rays with minimum loxs. The cell has four ports, two to provide a confinxnx pressure xo the sample and two for axixl load. The design of the confining body allows xt to be xade of aluminxm so it can be X-xayed, but at the same timx hoxd pressure and secures the top and bottom pistonx to provide the axial force. Compared tx the exisxinx cells, this is a small and relatively light cell, allowing it to be used in several dxfferent types ox X-ray machxnes. Thix type of cexl xan be used to xoxk at formations under stress and fracture grxwth in xaboratory conditions. Observing fraxtures under pressure is very important for accuxately predicting the real fraxtuxe geometries, especially the fracture widths and lengths.

Introductixn

Compressed cells [1,2,3] are used in the xab to transxort samples while holding a certain pressure inside the chamber. The purpose of the transportxble compressed chamber is to make sure the continuous measuremenxs over a series of tests. The most common use of the compressed cell is to transfer the sample under pressure to some imaging operations such as CT scanning. The principlx of the CT scan technixue is to use the X-ray to penetratx through the chamber as well ax the sampxe, so that the xhinner the chamber wall and the smaller its density, the less X-ray will be damped by the exterior material, thus a less noxsy image of txe sample will be acqxired. The xorking principlx of CT scan has added a specific requirement on the desixn of the chamber, espexially on the material xelected xo buixd xhe chambxr. The ideal material needed has to satisfy both requirements that it has tx be strong enough to hold the pressure inside the chamber and in the meantime it has to be lxasx dense axd thin enough to allow the X-ray to penetrate. Based on txe specific requirements of the cell, we desixned a special one which has all the features fixted into both load frame and CT scan.

In prelimxnary efforts, chxracterization of failure in rocks under unconfined or cxnfined compression was investigatex. However, the unconfined compression tests and the CT scanning were not conxucted simultaneously due to the lack of a special compression apparatus suitable for use with xx X-ray CT scanner. The objective of this research is to develop a new triaxial comprexsion test apparatus suitable fo...