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Differential Pressure Limiting Device for Screen Joints

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000243086D
Publication Date: 2015-Sep-14
Document File: 2 page(s) / 175K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Oil field screens are required to have a high level of collapse pressure integrity in the case that the filter media becomes completely plugged with fines. Fines tend to plug the exterior of the filter media when the screens are run in an unconsolidated formation, eventually causing collapse pressure on the screen. Screens are often times mated in-line with an inflow control device (ICD). In these cases, the fluid travels through the filter media, then through the annulus created by the filter media and base pipe. This could be a distance around or exceeding 30 feet in length. Fluid then enters the ICD and subsequently the inside of the base pipe, which is then produced to the surface. The filter media to base pipe annulus (otherwise known as a drainage layer) is typically created with a relatively thin sheet metal tube and/or shaped wires which support the filter media and maintain this annular space. In many cases the shaped wires act as both the filter media and the support layer to maintain this annular space leading to the ICD. Maintaining this annular space is critical in ICD applications; any decrease to the annulus will dramatically increase the pressure drop leading to the ICD. Subsequently, any increase in pressure drop can reduce the production of hydrocarbons through each screen/ICD joint. The industry standard for testing screen joints (ISO 17824) outlines a procedure for testing screens in both burst and collapse. However, there is no requirement for maintaining any annular space under the filter media after the collapse pressure is obtained. This is especially important for situations when an ICD would be mated to the screen joint. A company could easily pass a high pressure collapse test in accordance to the standard, but the filter media to base pipe annulus could be permanently closed, not allowing any flow to be able to travel through the screen joint ever again. This would eliminate the possibility of the operator to unplug the screen by backwashing or pumping acid, since there would be very limited to no area for fluid to travel. In a real world scenario, the screens could be run into mud, causing the filter media to plug, which in turn could collapse the annular space to the base pipe, permanently limiting or shutting off flow under the screen. This situation is not limited to screens with ICDs, the same result could occur in a stand-alone screen application, although the path to the inside of the base pipe from the filter media is typically much shorter due to the high perforation density found in the base pipe.

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Differential Pressure Limiting Device for Screen Joints

Abstract

Oil field screens are required to have a high level of collapse pressure integrity in the case that the filter media becomes completely plugged with fines. Fines tend to plug the exterior of the filter media when the screens are run in an unconsolidated formation, eventually causing collapse pressure on the screen.

Screens are often times mated in-line with an inflow control device (ICD). In these cases, the fluid travels through the filter media, then through the annulus created by the filter media and base pipe. This could be a distance around or exceeding 30 feet in length. Fluid then enters the ICD and subsequently the inside of the base pipe, which is then produced to the surface. The filter media to base pipe annulus (otherwise known as a drainage layer) is typically created with
a relatively thin sheet metal tube and/or shaped wires which support the filter media and maintain this annular space. In many cases the shaped wires act as both the filter media and the support layer to maintain this annular space leading to the ICD. Maintaining this annular space is critical in ICD applications; any decrease to the annulus will dramatically increase the pressure drop leading to the ICD. Subsequently, any increase in pressure drop can reduce the production of hydrocarbons through each screen/ICD joint.

The industry standard for testing screen joints (ISO 17824) outlines a procedure for testing screens in both burst and collapse. However, there is no requirement for maintaining any annular space under the filter media after the collapse pressure is obtained. This is especially important for situations when an ICD would be mated to the screen joint. A company could easily pass a high pressure collapse test in accordance to the standard, but the filter media to base pipe annulus could be permanently closed, not allowing any flow to be able to travel through the screen joint ever again. This would eliminate the possibility of the operator to unplug the screen by backwashing or pumping acid, since there would be very limited to no area for fluid to travel. In a real world scenario, the screens could be run into mud, causing the filter media to plug, which in turn could collapse the annular space to the base pipe, permanently limiting or shutting off flow under the screen. This situation is not limited to screens with ICDs, the same result could occur in a stand-alone screen application, although the path to the inside of the base pipe from the filter media is typically much shorter due to the high perforation density found in the base pipe.

Design/ Function

Disclosed below is a method to limit the differential co...