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Cross Coupling Connection Methods for Created Flow Annulus for Screen Joints

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000243087D
Publication Date: 2015-Sep-14
Document File: 3 page(s) / 339K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Oil field screens most often are standalone screens (SAS) and only share an inner annulus through the base pipe. Some applications however dictate a shared annulus from one screen joint to the next using a device the seals across the coupled connection. The initial annulus is created by the screen with the open area between the inner profile of the screen and the outer diameter of the base pipe. This screen annulus is consistent from one joint to the next, but there is a need for a method of connecting one flow space to the next across the coupling. The connection method must create a seal as good as that of the screen gauge or micron size to retain sand control. An issue that exists with this type of connection method is the eccentricity of the two screen joints when compared to one another. The outer diameter can vary substantially from one base pipe to the next. Assuming the connecting parts are centered to the individual pipe on which it resides there will still be a mismatch in alignment. There has to be a method in place to overcome this lack of concentricity. The method of crimping was done in the past to create this cross coupling connection. A shroud was mechanically fixed to one screen joint on one end of the tube. This was done by applying enough of a load to plastically deform the shroud to the screen joint reducing the outer diameter. On the opposing end the shroud stabs over an O-ring creating a sand tight seal. Even though the method of crimping works as a cross coupling connection for a shared annular space it has proven to be expensive, time consuming, and difficult to verify success of the seal.

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Cross Coupling Connection Methods for Created Flow Annulus for Screen Joints

Abstract

Oil field screens most often are standalone screens (SAS) and only share an inner annulus through the base pipe. Some applications however dictate a shared annulus from one screen joint to the next using a device the seals across the coupled connection. The initial annulus is created by the screen with the open area between the inner profile of the screen and the outer diameter of the base pipe. This screen annulus is consistent from one joint to the next, but there is a need for a method of connecting one flow space to the next across the coupling. The connection method must create a seal as good as that of the screen gauge or micron size to retain sand control.

An issue that exists with this type of connection method is the eccentricity of the two screen joints when compared to one another. The outer diameter can vary substantially from one base pipe to the next. Assuming the connecting parts are centered to the individual pipe on which it resides there will still be a mismatch in alignment. There has to be a method in place to overcome this lack of concentricity.

The method of crimping was done in the past to create this cross coupling connection. A shroud was mechanically fixed to one screen joint on one end of the tube. This was done by applying enough of a load to plastically deform the shroud to the screen joint reducing the outer diameter. On the opposing end the shroud stabs over an O-ring creating a sand tight seal. Even though the method of crimping works as a cross coupling connection for a shared annular space it has proven to be expensive, time consuming, and difficult to verify success of the seal.

Design/ Function

Disclosed below is a methods for creating a cross coupling connection. This will create a shared fluid annulus for screen joints to communicate.

This design is built around the concept of utilizing a wedge to help account for the lack of concentricity between the two screen joints. The wedge creates a sloped surface to force alignment. As a part converges in the direction of the wedge it is forced to orient itself to the profile of the sloped shape. This application will not perfectly align the axis of the part converging on the wedge, but it will center a percentage, enough to form a surface to surface stop. In some regard there may be plastic deformation that helps form the two parts together. Either...