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Filled Cavities Created By 3D Additive Manufacturing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000243090D
Publication Date: 2015-Sep-14
Document File: 3 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

3D printing or Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a process in which successive layers of material are laid down under computer control to produce 3D objects. As such, these objects can be manufactured into almost any shape or geometry. These parts can include the creation of cavities that can be filled with gas/liquids/solid materials to enhance the functionality. Applications using 3D AM in creating parts which utilize cavities are listed in this paper.

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Filled Cavities Created By 3D Additive Manufacturing

3D printing or Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a process in which successive layers of material are laid down under computer control to produce 3D objects. As such, these objects can be manufactured into almost any shape or geometry. These parts can include the creation of cavities that can be filled with gas/liquids/solid materials to enhance the functionality. Applications using 3D AM in creating parts which utilize cavities are listed in this paper.

Introduction:

Typically when voids are created with 3D AM, the base powder fills the voids. If the voids are completely encapsulated the powder remains inside the part. The creating of these cavities and the materials deposited are discussed

Description:

Several examples of using these filled voids are:


1. In the following illustration, the cylinder on the left is built without voids. The wall thickness of the cylinder limits the pressure rating to less than 30,000 psi. The cylinder on the right is built in a pressurized 3D printer that is pressurized to 15,000 psi during manufacturing. Noble gas such as Argon can be used in the 3D Additive Machine. As the part is built, 15,000 psi is trapped in the cavity along with the base powder.

Abstract:



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The increase in pressure containment ability can be seen with the following calculations:

Left --- A cylinder with a 0.5" ID x 0.658" OD and 110,000 minimum yield is limited to 26838 psi differential pressure based on Von Mises.

Right --- A cylinder that has a 0.5" ID x 0.573" OD and 110,000 minimum yield is good for 15,000 psi differential pressure. A cylinder that has a 0.575" ID x 0.658" OD and 110,000 minimum yield is good for 15,000 psi differential pressure. Thus, a combination cylinder with a 0.5" ID, 15,000 psi in between and a 0.658" OD is good for 30,000 psi pressure.

A different method of creating pressure in the void is to enclose chemicals within the void during manufacturing of the part. The finished part can be placed in an autoclave that causes the chemicals to react/burn out gas which creates pressure in the void. Alternatively, pressure can be created in the void by containing a chemical that changes its volume due to temperature: expands, boils, freezes.


2. Helium can be trapped in micro voids in a structure. If the structure starts to create micro cracks, the Helium would be released and could be detected. The idea is to detect the Helium release before a catastrophic failure occurs. An alternative method is to use the detection of Helium at the inspection stage of the manufacturing process to detect micro cracks.


3. Trapping a fluid in a cavity/matrix that causes the overall shape to expand or contract due to changes in temperature. An example would be to trap water in the cavity/matrix. When the part freezes, the water/ice expansion causes the part to swell or when the part...