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Motorized RF Bi‐Polar Transection Device with Reversing Knife Tissue Sensing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000243124D
Publication Date: 2015-Sep-16
Document File: 4 page(s) / 295K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

When a motorized RF bi-polar transection device that uses an I beam to close the jaws and cut tissue uses a final tone for seal complete (from a generator) at the end of the knife stroke there is no way to tell if the tissue remains sealed as the knife travels back to its start position. Sensing what is happening to the tissue as the I-beam is returned may prove to be beneficial.

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Motorized RF Bi‐Polar Transection Device with Reversing Knife Tissue  Sensing

Problem:

When a motorized RF bi-polar transection device that uses an I beam to close the jaws and cut tissue uses a final tone for seal complete (from a generator) at the end of the knife stroke there is no way to tell if the tissue remains sealed as the knife travels back to its start position. Sensing what is happening to the tissue as the I-beam is returned may prove to be beneficial.

Solution:

A motorized RF bi-polar transection device with a microprocessor (either on the device or in the generator) could use the knife pull back time to reassess the impedance and the force to return to get an assessment of how well the seal was done. As the knife returns a low level RF pulse could be sent through the tissue to see if the impedance indicates a good seal. If not then the knife could slow down and send out another sealing RF pulse as the knife returns. The load to return the knife could also be monitored and if it is too high then the motor could slow down the speed of the returning knife and tell the generator to send a RF sealing pulse to cook tissue to maybe allow the force to return to be lower. If there is thick tissue in the back and thin tissue in the front the return monitoring can ensure that the thick tissue is properly cooked down or sealed. If the impedance is measured too high on the return than the knife (I-beam) can slow down and a cooking pulse can be appli...