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A Mechanism to Show How Content Has Changed over Time

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000243493D
Publication Date: 2015-Sep-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a system to actively manage document changes for the user of a large document repository. Based on the userĂ¢?Ts explicit and implicit interest in the document, the system notifies the user in real time of key document changes during active browsing or searching.

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A Mechanism to Show How Content Has Changed over Time

In a large set of documents or a document library , version control is often difficult to achieve because the changes/updates to a document are not always obvious to a reader. While many ways are available for marking changed content or tracking whole (not page-specific) versions and changes to a library of files, good methods that apply specifically to a technical content corpus are lacking.

In current technical content systems, tracking changes to documentation is typically passive and broad. The user has to know what to look for and then review some static representation of changes (e.g., colored text or change revision marks), or the user has to look at un-intelligent widgets that simply report recently updated files, regardless of

whether the files are relevant to the user (often as the list scrolls by in a ticker-tape like presentation). In either case, it is up to the user to look for and find relevant changes .

The proposed solution adds insight into actual content changes based on per page analysis and duplication comparison. The novel system tracks and marks changes by product, and then shows the changes in one of two ways. The system shows changes as topic changes (i.e. the same topic changing with revision) or as changes from one product version to another product version. If a user wants to see in-page updates or updates between releases, then the system can dynamically show that to the user. Equally important, the system also shows the user what has not changed over time or over a release boundary.

The novel system actively manages changes for the user. Based on the user's explicit and implicit interest in the document, the system notifies the user in real time of key document changes during active browsing or searching.

In the simplest case for a web-based product, such as a product documentation repository, the system dynamically shows revisions in-place upon user request. When the user comes to a previously visited item (which indicates implicit interest) and the system identifies that content has changed beyond a certain trivial threshold , the system shows the user the topic in which the changes exist as well as the changes in the topic.

If the user subscribes to specific content (or gives explicit notice that this content is of interest), then the system notifies the user of the changes (as in a Really Simple Syndication (RSS) feed), and dynamically displays the changes in the content user interface (UI) when the user returns to the documentation repository . Further, with explicit interest, the system can provide users with historical choices on views of a document, so users can see a history...