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Browse Prior Art Database

Share Maps: An Application Independent Mechanism for Socially Combining Network Domains

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000243494D
Publication Date: 2015-Sep-24
Document File: 4 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a mechanism for combining network domains into a share map. The share map is a declaration, within a network domain or sub-domain, which determines the context under which a site can be matched with other sites, and then the declared value becomes a simple key that makes the match.

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Share Maps: :

An Application Independent Mechanism for Socially Combining Network

         An Application Independent Mechanism for Socially Combining Network Domains

Currently, network site domains are generally owned, operated, and maintained through hierarchical control, and in a top-down fashion. Users are familiar with, for example, the notion of a system administrator, or webmaster who owns access to the root of a domain or web site, effectively owning and defining that site. However, sites in a network--most typically the Internet or an intranet--can be profitably grouped as single sites or domains for particular contexts.

Proposed herein is a simple, application-independent mechanism that allows groups of sites or sub-sites to be treated as groups through a social declaration process .

For example, one company might own several sites under different domain names , and from a site domain perspective, each is a separate entity. If a user searches for a site on a standard browser, a search limited to, for example, companyX.com does not find results for sites that the company owns under a different domain name .

On attempt to address this is for a webmaster to create a "custom search" to tie the company's associated sites together through a browser-supplied tool. Alternatively, the browser can infer from links, or public statements, that Company X owns Company Y,

who owns CompnayZ.net.

That inference is not explicitly declared, and is not extendable to other search engines or even to an individual browser's organic search results limited by domain. Similarly, an application within a cognitive system can tie related domains together based on textual analytics and inference or even human-contributed rules. However, this is proprietary, hidden completely, and based on a top-down approach: what can be inferred by an application about a number of sites that may tie them together .

The novel solution replaces this inference with a directly expressed connection between sites. By means of a simple, well-formed, public Extensible Markup Language (XML) file, users are able to associate any number of independent network sites or sub -sites as the combination of those sites for a given context . By including this XML file in a

well-known place, the user effectively tells applications to have the system include content in a certain collective group, for a given context.

Metaphorically, the way this is done right now by applications is the equivalent of someone in a room full of people inferring who should belong in a given group by proximity, importance, or because they know them. The novel approach is the metaphorical equivalent of the people in a room raising hands to be included in a group under certain well-known conditions.

The novel contribution is a share map . The share map is a declaration, within a network domain or sub-domain, which determines the context under which a site can be matched with others. The declared value becomes a simple...