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A METHOD FOR WEARABLES BASED RETAIL PRODUCTS PRICE COMPARISON AND CONVERSION

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000243626D
Publication Date: 2015-Oct-06
Document File: 5 page(s) / 135K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Ronnie Dan: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A method is presented in which consumers 'carry on their wrists' some of their on line product browsing priorities and history This allows retailers to react to that information and try to convert it to a sale on their terms The retailer can also determine when it is most likely going to result in a sale that would otherwise end up being lost to a 'ShowRooming' customer

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

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A METHOD FOR WEARABLES BASED RETAIL PRODUCTS PRICE COMPARISON AND CONVERSION

 AUTHORS: Ronnie Dan Robert Cressey Patricia Patitucci

CISCO SYSTEMS, INC.

ABSTRACT

    A method is presented in which consumers 'carry on their wrists' some of their on- line product browsing priorities and history. This allows retailers to react to that information, and try to convert it to a sale, on their terms. The retailer can also determine when it is most likely going to result in a sale that would otherwise end up being lost to a 'ShowRooming' customer.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

     'ShowRooming' is the practice of examining merchandise in a traditional brick and mortar retail store or other offline setting, and then buying it online, often at a lower price. A 2012 comScore study found 35% of U.S. consumers reported showrooming for 25 and 34 years olds. A 2013 survey polled 750 U.S. consumers, 73% of whom reported having showroomed in the previous six months. Showrooming can be costly to retailers, not only in terms of the loss of the sale, but also due to damage caused to the store's floor samples of a product through constant examination from consumers.

    A method is presented herein to allow users to refer to their PC (for example) while browsing e-commerce websites such as Amazon.comĀ®, where they would get a corresponding graphic on their smartwatch device pointing at their PC while browsing. FIGs. 1-4 below graphically illustrate the steps of this method.

    If a user pulls through that graphic while their PC browser is on an product-page, the smartwatch application would 'ingest' the online service product data (including price)

Copyright 2015 Cisco Systems, Inc.

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off that page, and save this data under a universal, unique product identifier. This is depicted in FIG. 1.

FIG. 1

    Later, the user happens to see the same product they were researching on Amazon.com in a retail store. This is shown in FIG. 2.

FIG. 2

Copyright 2015 Cisco Systems, Inc.

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    The user could quickly pull through a similar graphic pointing to that same product using the smartwatch application, as shown in FIG. 2.

FIG. 3 below shows a user being able to compare prices.
FIG. 3

    Due to the foreknowledge of that same prod...