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Auxiliary Audio signal routing technique in Radio Infrastructure Voting System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000243671D
Original Publication Date: 2015-Oct-09
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2015-Oct-09
Document File: 6 page(s) / 125K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Agmon, Eran: INVENTOR [+4]

Abstract

This document describes a method for the dispatchers to listen to multiple radios in a Land Mobile Radio voting system. Land Mobile Radio Voting systems provide multiple infrastructure sites which radio units can transmit into and can receive audio from (via multicast or simulcast), in some cases hundreds of infrastructure sites may be used. Hundreds of radio units can be scatter throughout the area covered by the infrastructure sites. An infrastructure voting device will evaluate the audio signal (digital or analog) from each infrastructure site to determine which audio stream or audio segments should be used to route to the dispatchers and to transmit to the other radio units. Audio streams or audio segments are given an audio quality signal level by which current day voting devices use to pick the audio stream or audio segments that will be routed to the dispatchers and to other radio units. Generally, radio users will listen before transmitting to avoid contention between multiple transmitting radio units, but there is no feedback to the radio user if their call is being received by the dispatchers and other radio users. With a large number of radio users spread out over a large number of infrastructure sites, the chances of radio users keying up at the same time or nearly the same increase. There are generally two types of voting methods, Vote and Hold or Continuous voting. With Vote and Hold the audio quality is sampled at the beginning of the call and the audio from the infrastructure site with the best audio quality will be used for the duration of the call. When radio calls are short and the radio units are stationary, this method works pretty good. Continuous Voting allows the voting device to periodically select audio segments from different infrastructure sites throughout the duration of the call. When using these voting methods when two or more radio units that is located at different infrastructure sites, key up at nearly the same time, the voting device may only allow a single audio stream to be routed to the dispatchers and to the other radio units. The other radio user that keyed up may not be heard by anyone. The Auxiliary Audio Routing Technique will evaluate the audio streams from each site and determine which audio streams are from the same radio units and which audio streams are from different radio units. When there are audio streams from different radio units, the highest priority radio audio stream will be routed to the primary channel and lower priority radio audio streams will be summed and routed to the auxiliary dispatch channel. For the primary channel, the audio is transmitted to the radio units at each site and to the dispatchers. For the auxiliary channel, the audio is routed only to the dispatchers. Optionally, the primary channel could have the audio from multiple radios summed together.

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Auxiliary Audio Routing Technique in a Radio Infrastructure Voting System

By Author’s Eran Agmon, Pavel Livshits, Iftach Sharabi, William Felderman

Motorola Solutions, Inc.

 

ABSTRACT

This document describes a method for the dispatchers to listen to multiple radios in a Land Mobile Radio voting system.

Land Mobile Radio Voting systems provide multiple infrastructure sites which radio units can transmit into and can receive audio from (via multicast or simulcast), in some cases hundreds of infrastructure sites may be used.  Hundreds of radio units can be scatter throughout the area covered by the infrastructure sites. An infrastructure voting device will evaluate the audio signal (digital or analog) from each infrastructure site to determine which audio stream or audio segments should be used to route to the dispatchers and to transmit to the other radio units. Audio streams or audio segments are given an audio quality signal level by which current day voting devices use to pick the audio stream or audio segments that will be routed to the dispatchers and to other radio units.

Generally, radio users will listen before transmitting to avoid contention between multiple transmitting radio units, but there is no feedback to the radio user if their call is being received by the dispatchers and other radio users. With a large number of radio users spread out over a large number of infrastructure sites, the chances of radio users keying up at the same time or nearly the same increase.

There are generally two types of voting methods, Vote and Hold or Continuous voting.

With Vote and Hold the audio quality is sampled at the beginning of the call and the audio from the infrastructure site with the best audio quality will be used for the duration of the call. When radio calls are short and the radio units are stationary, this method works pretty good.

Continuous Voting allows the voting device to periodically select audio segments from different infrastructure sites throughout the duration of the call.

When using these voting methods when two or more radio units that is located at different infrastructure sites, key up at nearly the same time, the voting device may only allow a single audio stream to be routed to the dispatchers and to the other radio units. The other radio user that keyed up may not be heard by anyone.

The Auxiliary Audio Routing Technique will evaluate the audio streams from each site and determine which audio streams are from the same radio units and which audio streams are from different radio units. When there are audio streams from different radio units, the highest priority radio audio stream will be routed to the primary channel and lower priority radio audio streams will be summed and routed to the auxiliary dispatch channel. For the primary channel, the audio is transmitted to the radio units at each site and to the dispatchers. For the auxiliary channel, the audio is routed only to the dispatchers. Optionally, the primary cha...