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BARRIER FLUID FOR ROTATING MACHINES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000243712D
Publication Date: 2015-Oct-14
Document File: 6 page(s) / 299K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The present disclosure relates to barrier fluid for subsea fluid processing equipment More specifically the present disclosure relates to a barrier fluid for rotating machines like subsea pumps and subsea compressors It is proposed to use oil composition technology to address nuisances generated by high frictions and high temperature generated by subsea rotating machines High efficiency lubricants generally offer lower friction across a wide range of temperatures and conditions Some of these high efficiency lubricants contain ester based additives that have been found particularly suited for applications to subsea rotating machines in particular for subsea pumps and compressors as is further described in this publication

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BARRIER FLUID FOR ROTATING MACHINES


[0001] The present disclosure relates to barrier fluid for subsea fluid processing equipment. More specifically, the present disclosure relates to a barrier fluid for rotating machines like subsea pumps and subsea compressors.

[0002] Within rotating machines like pumps and compressor the dynamic seals play a key role as a component part of these machines, for example used subsea. AS described in patent application WO2014127048, the dynamic seals, seal off the lubrication fluid verses the pumping/compressor fluid. The lubrication fluid (also known as the barrier fluid) used for the dynamic seals is set so to have overpressure versus the pumping or compressing fluid. Reason being that the barrier fluid is a clean fluid, providing lubrication and cooling. Further the barrier fluid acts as a barrier to the process materials which may include sand, H2S and scale, as can be found - for example in the oil and gas process- and which the seal has benefit by being protected against. The dynamic seals with reference to figure 1 may contain a static part and a dynamic part. In some applications both parts may be dynamic/contra rotating. In these circumstances, the high speed and high shear force in these parts result in frictional losses resulting in substantial heat generation .The temperature may, in some condition, exceed the level where the barrier fluid/lubricant might encounter general thermal degradation and/or segregation of additive components from the oil.

[0003] This segregation of additives and/or these thermal degradation biproducts may result in deposit build up on the dynamic seal face which may lead to operational disturbance in component i.e. too high or too low oil consumption. Low consumption may

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lead to damage to the seal surface due to loss of local cooling and subsequent accelerated thermal degradation and escalated deposit build up.

[0004] It is therefore proposed to use oil composition technology to address nuisances generated by high frictions and high temperature generated by subsea rotating machines.
[0005] High efficiency lubricants generally offer lower friction across a wide range of temperatures and conditions. Some of these high efficiency lubricants contain ester based additives that have been found particularly suited for applications to subsea rotating machines, in particular for subsea pumps and compressors as will be further described below.

[0006] The exampled dynamic seal as described above is made of ceramics surfaces sliding against each other, and is showed in Figure 1. A little bit of barrier fluid is consumed as a small amount of fluid passes from inside (clean side) to the process side. The pressure between seal faces depends on the operational conditions; primarily the barrier fluid pressure differential verses process pressure. In figure 1, the seal face (332) moves relatively to seat (334) and generates heat. This heat may be substantial and...