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Privacy Preserving, Occupant Driven Energy Management of Offices using Chair Based Sensors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000243755D
Publication Date: 2015-Oct-16
Document File: 2 page(s) / 181K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosing a system and methodology for privacy preserving, occupancy based energy management which uses hardware embedded in chairs for centralized energy management in office spaces.

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Privacy Preserving, Occupant Driven Energy Management of Offices using Chair Based Sensors

Commercial buildings consume around 20% of US energy needs. Building energy consumption has grown by 69% between 1980 and 2009 [1]. Bulk of loads in office buildings are occupancy-driven with: (i) Heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) consuming 60% of total building energy, and (ii) Lighting consuming 15% of total building energy [1]. Hence occupancy-based energy management can drive significant energy and cost savings.

Our proposed solution (Figure 1) is a system and methodology for privacy preserving, occupancy based energy management which
- Uses hardware (pressure sensor, light sensor, and temperature sensor) embedded in chairs for centralized energy management in office spaces
- Uses pressure sensors embedded in chairs to infer zonal occupancy in offices, e.g. n people
- Uses lighting sensors for indoor localization through triangulation, e.g. (X,Y) locations
- Uses temperature sensors for granular thermal comfort sensing and control.

- Requires no user identification, thus preserving privacy

Chair locations might change dynamically, hence mapping between chairs and zones can change in real time. We use flickering (LED) lights at a high (kHz) frequency, which gets detected by the light sensor embedded on the chair, to identify the chair's position [2]. From that data, zone occupancy is estimated by measuring the number of chairs that are occupied. After localization, we correlate changes in measurements by the temperature sensor on chair to changes in damper

positions of various VAVs to quantify effect of each VAV on a given location.

To perform thermal control, two goals needs to be...