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Control Message Data Path In a Virtualized Switch Environment

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000243850D
Publication Date: 2015-Oct-22
Document File: 4 page(s) / 463K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Greg Page: INVENTOR [+4]

Abstract

Is described a software architecture for a chassis based switch which utilizes virtual machine VM to manage different hardware components These VMs are designed to emulate independent and isolated microprocessor subsystems indistinguishable from the legacy physical implementations and must also be able to communicate with both their virtual as well as physical counterparts consistent with the current inter intra chassis communication protocols The challenge is to create such a communication mechanism without investing in additional hardware components while also ensuring complete backward compatibility

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Control Message Data Path In a Virtualized Switch Environment

Authors: Chiang Yeh; Vadivel Poonathan; Nalinakshan Kunnath; Greg Page 

Is described a software architecture for a chassis based switch which utilizes virtual machine (VM) to manage different hardware components.  These VMs are designed to emulate independent and isolated microprocessor subsystems indistinguishable from the legacy physical implementations, and must also be able to communicate with both their virtual as well as physical counterparts consistent with the current inter/intra-chassis communication protocols.  The challenge is to create such a communication mechanism without investing in additional hardware components, while also ensuring complete backward compatibility.

A Brief Description of the VM Framework

Traditionally, chassis products have separate microprocessor subsystems dedicated to either management or line card modules.  i.e. management processors have an entirely self-contained, purpose-built software image dedicated to initializing and maintaining the switching fabric, process IPC messages, and manage chassis wide protocol stacks and tasks; while line card processors have their own self-contained, purpose-built software image dedicated to initializing and maintaining the local switching ASIC, and manage local protocol stacks and tasks.  One of the goals is to preserve this separate organization of management and line card while also allowing cohabitation of the two within a single microprocessor subsystem.  One simplistic way to accomplish this goal is to effect a virtual separation using virtual machines (VMs), as illust...