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Use of Sound Processor for tactile hearing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000243895D
Publication Date: 2015-Oct-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 393K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Sensory substitution is a non invasive technique for circumventing the loss of one sense by feeding its information through another channel Although cochlear implants are highly effective only a small percentage of deaf people in the world have the financial means to purchase a cochlear implant Therefore a more cost effective system is needed to provide its benefits A system is needed to combine the benefits of a cochlear implant and the technology of sensory substitution which might be less expensive for the end user

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Title

Use of Sound Processor for tactile hearing

Problem Addressed 

Sensory substitution is a non-invasive technique for circumventing the loss of one sense by feeding its information through another channel. Although cochlear implants are highly-effective, only a small percentage of deaf people in the world have the financial means to purchase a cochlear implant.  Therefore, a more cost-effective system is needed to provide its benefits.  A system is needed to combine the benefits of a cochlear implant and the technology of sensory substitution, which might be less expensive for the end-user.

Known Solutions/Approaches

Tactile hearing has been tried in the past.  Several devices existed, but went out of use due to the success of cochlear implants.

Novelty Statement

The novel solution is to use a cochlear implant sound processor to drive a tactile hearing aid.  The new system comprises a non-invasive, low-cost vibratory vest that allows those with deafness or severe hearing impairments to perceive auditory information through small vibrations on the torso.

Description (Components, Process)

Existing sound processors drive the tactile hearing aid.  The sound processor has the microphones in the appropriate location and the processing capabilities to turn sound into discrete stimuli.

Figure 1: Tactile system using sound processor

Figure 2: Placement on the user

Example Embodiment

Figure: Implementation

Benefits of the Solution

A tactile hearing aid is non-invasive and cos...