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FLEXIBLE ACRYLIC RESIN TECHNOLOGY

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000244153D
Publication Date: 2015-Nov-16
Document File: 18 page(s) / 2M

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Martin, Robert: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Dow Plastics Additives a business unit of The Dow Chemical Company NYSE DOW is introducing a new flexible acrylic resin FAR technology This FAR product line offers several grades in powder form and can be converted into film or sheet products via conventional melt processing equipment FAR film and sheet products exhibit excellent crease whitening resistance UV weather resistance and superior color retention properties in outdoor environments Additionally due to their higher surface energy compared to polyolefin and PVC matrices FAR film or sheet products can offer outstanding printability paintability and good adhesion to a variety of plastic substrates Moreover some grades of FAR can offer excellent optical properties and can be formulated with haze as low as 1 for a 300 µm thick film FAR is miscible with PVC and miscible or compatible with other thermoplastics including polyolefin polylactic acid PLA TPU polyester PET PBT and polycarbonate FAR PVC blends can be converted into thin film or sheet and extruded or molded into shapes with conventional melt processing equipment Parts made from these blend resin products possess excellent UV weather resistance and crease whitening resistance

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Flexible Acrylic Resin Technology

Dow Plastics Additives, a business unit of The Dow Chemical Company (NYSE: DOW), is introducing a new flexible acrylic resin (FAR) technology. This FAR product line offers several grades in powder form, and can be converted into film or sheet products via conventional melt processing equipment. FAR film and sheet products exhibit excellent crease-whitening resistance, UV/weather resistance, and superior color retention properties in outdoor environments. Additionally, due to their higher surface energy compared to polyolefin and PVC matrices, FAR film or sheet products can offer outstanding printability, paintability and good adhesion to a variety of plastic substrates. Moreover, some grades of FAR can offer excellent optical properties and can be formulated with haze as low as <1% for a 300 µm thick film. FAR is miscible with PVC and miscible or compatible with other thermoplastics, including polyolefin, polylactic acid (PLA), TPU, polyester (PET, PBT) and polycarbonate. FAR/PVC blends can be converted into thin film or sheet, and extruded or molded into shapes with conventional melt processing equipment. Parts made from these blend resin products possess excellent UV/weather resistance and crease-whitening resistance.

  1.0 Introduction

1.1 FAR emulsion polymerization process An FAR polymer is prepared using an emulsion polymerization process. The detailed emulsion process has been disclosed in WO2014/035608A1. FAR consists of multilayer acrylic polymer particles prepared by a sequential emulsion polymerization process. For detailed FAR composition, please reference WO2014/035608A1.  

1.2 FAR polymer isolation   An FAR polymer can be isolated from the emulsion product as a powder, or other solid particles, using various methods, including spray drying, coagulation and oven drying, freeze-drying, and de-volatilizing extrusion.  

1.3 Melt processing of FAR products   FAR is offered in powder form, and can be converted into pellet form by extrusion; FAR powders or pellets can be converted into flexible film, sheet, tubing, and pipe products via conventional melt-processing equipment, including extrusion, injection molding, and thermoforming. FAR may be melt processed as is, or in combination with additives as described below. If additives are included, they may be combined with FAR powder by a range of blending methods. For example, a Henschel Blender (available from Henschel Mixers Americas, Houston, Texas), may be used to blend the acrylic polymer with additives. Hand blending (e.g., by shaking the components of the acrylic polymer in a bag) may also be employed to mix the powder. In addition, compounding can be used to extrude pellets.   One common form of melt-processing to make film or sheet products is the cast film process that involves the extrusion of polymers melted through a slot or flat die to form a thin, molten sheet or film. This film is "pinned" to the surface of a chill roll (typically water-cooled and c...