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A method to identify user's preference for results on the search result page

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000244238D
Publication Date: 2015-Nov-25
Document File: 5 page(s) / 129K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

When people are viewing a search result page, it is often the case that most results there are what they have viewed, but they could not recall their preference for these results unless they open the result links to view them again. A method is proposed here to show users' own preference of the web page content on the result page. It utilizes a toolbox that contains a flower, a cross and a question mark, which can be placed by users so that they can identify their preference for each result on the research result page through these marks. This method improves the efficiency when users are comparing and choosing the results that are most useful to them among a large number of results they've viewed.

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A method to identify user

A method to identify user'

When people are viewing the search result page, it is often the case that even though they've viewed every result on it, they don't remember how they evaluated the content of each result unless they click the result link and go through it again. Below is a typical case:

You are looking for a hotel. You search on travel websites, which give you a long list of results. You click every result on the first three result pages, and find some competitive hotels that interest you. As it's not an urgent task, you want to leave the decision to tomorrow. The next day, you search again for the hotel on these websites, and find the results are mostly what you've viewed. However, you cannot identify those hotels interested you yesterday by looking at the result page, so you have to open every link again and recall your judgments. It takes you a while to go through the results, not only because of the large number of results, but also because each result contains much information.

This disclosure discloses a method to help users quickly recall their preference for the content on the web page from the result page. This method improves the efficiency when users are comparing and choosing the results that are most useful to them among a large number of results they've viewed. For example, this method helps when you are comparing different hotels and want to select one from them, or you are collecting literature most relevant to your study among much related literature.

The method utilizes a toolbox that contains a flower, a cross and a question mark. When users are viewing a web page, they can place these marks on the content they like, dislike or aren't sure they like or dislike. These marks will be displayed on the result page, next to the corresponding results. Users can hover over these marks to preview the content on the web page that is being marked, and also sort the results according to the type and number of marks they have placed.

The advantages of this invention are:

Users don't have to view the web page again if it still appears on the result page. Their judgment of the web page content is displayed directly on the result page by marks.

The marks user placed can be saved. The connection between the web page and your own marks won't be lost when you close the browser.

The marks are not limited to any content type. No matter the content is about goods, articles, or solutions, you are able to place your mark on corresponding part of the content.

The invention takes the following steps to work:

1. A toolbox hovers on the screen when you get the search result page.


2. While you are viewing each result, you can choose any tool in the toolbox to mark on the page (by dragging or double clicking). Your preference of the content can be marked by three tools, which are described in the following table:

Your preference

Tool

1

''s preference for results on the search result page

s preference for...