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MULTI MODALITY INSPECTION TECHNIQUE FOR CERAMIC MATRIX COMPOSITE CMC

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000244252D
Publication Date: 2015-Nov-26
Document File: 7 page(s) / 641K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A multi modality inspection technique for ceramic matrix composite parts is disclosed The multi modality technique combines infra red IR with either computed tomography CT or digital radiography DR The multi modality technique provides direct measurement of diffusivity Further features or defects that one modality misses are detected by the other modality of the multi modality technique

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MULTI-MODALITY INSPECTION TECHNIQUE FOR CERAMIC MATRIX COMPOSITE (CMC)

BACKGROUND

 

The present disclosure relates generally to non-destructive evaluation (NDE) inspection and more particularly to multi-modality inspection technique for ceramic matrix composite (CMC).

Ceramic-matrix composite (CMC) materials have been identified as potential candidates for high-temperature structural applications because of their high-temperature strength, light weight, and excellent corrosion and wear resistance. However, use of appropriate nondestructive evaluation (NDE) approaches is critical for assurance of high-quality products and reliable performance in service.

A variety of non-destructive evaluation inspection modalities are available to inspect industrial components, including infrared radiography (IR), ultrasound (UT) inspection, eddy current (EC) inspection, digital radiography (DR), coordinate measuring machine (CMM), optical measurement and computed tomography (CT). Selection of the NDE modality involves considering the number and types of flaws contained within a material and capability and limitations of each modality. Generally, ceramic-matrix composites contain several types of defects, including inter-laminar porosity and processing-induced voids among others.

Computed tomography (CT) provides a cross-sectional view of an object's interior and is well suited to characterizing a material's integrity. Radiography, for example is used to determine inherent material properties such as composition, particle size, and density, and evaluating manufacturing properties such as existing flaws and complexities. Using radiography, a wide range of material thickness levels and complex shapes may be assessed.  However, access to opposite sides of the test object is required, and to maximize the likelihood of detection, cracks must be oriented nearly parallel to the beam. Further, delaminations are almost always undetectable.

It would be desirable to have an improved technique for NDE inspection of ceramic matrix composite parts.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

Figure 1 shows a comparison of vendor computed tomography data with micro-computed tomography (CT) data for the same slice.

Figure 2 shows an infra-red image of a flow path.

Figure 3 depicts fusion of infra-red (IR) and CT images to measure diffusivity, according to an embodiment of the multi-modality technique described herein.

Figure 4 depicts and IR image of the EBC coating on ceramic matrix composite and CT wall thickness image.

Figure 5 depicts CT to FEM shrink wrap approach according to an embodiment of the multi-modality technique described herein.

Figure 6 depicts material/defect classification and hand-segmented defects according to an embodiment of multimodality technique described herein.

Figure 7 depicts void analysis from CT images according to an embodiment of multimodality technique described herein.

Figure 8 depicts aligned CT surface models.

Figure 9 wall thickness compared to CAD...