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Method for Industrial Quality Inspection

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000244278D
Publication Date: 2015-Nov-30
Document File: 3 page(s) / 437K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Martin Kefer: AUTHOR

Abstract

A method is described for a general quality inspection procedure in an industrial manufacturing environment Quality inspection of parts is a complex and cumbersome task To this day it is a task which has seen only little automation and is thus manually conducted by laborers Consequently a rather undefined opinion instead of a concrete measure in digits is ground for any further decision making By the end of a laborer s shift this opinion might change and thus might give room for unwanted errors While existing methods describe a workflow which closely related to the actual setup a more general workflow is proposed here which is universally applicable regardless of the type of sensor used for measurements and regardless of the physical setup A generalized automatic inspection procedure not limited to visual cosmetic quality inspection Introducing fuzzy and intelligent decision making capabilities By monitoring all measurements the tendency or behavior of those measurements might infer degradation in a preceding manufacturing process

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Page 01 of 3

Method for industrial quality inspection

Background

A method is described for a general quality inspection procedure in an industrial manufacturing environment. Quality inspection of parts is a complex and cumbersome task. To this day it is a task which has seen only little automation and is thus manually conducted by laborers. Consequently, a rather "undefined" opinion instead of a concrete measure in digits is ground for any further decision making. By the end of a laborer's shift this opinion might change and, thus, might give room for unwanted errors.

While existing methods describe a workflow which closely related to the actual setup, a more general workflow is proposed here which is universally applicable regardless of the type of sensor used for measurements, and regardless of the physical setup.

Description

A general method for an automated quality inspection is described in several steps, involving a reference measure created before the object in question is inspected. It involves a preparation stage where objects are prepared in such a way that meaningful, robust and repeated measurements over a long period of time (several hours) for a batch of objects can be taken. After taking the actual measurement the retrieved measure is analyzed and evaluated with respect to the created reference measure. Based on this evaluation a decision stage will conclude how to further proceed with the object of interest.

What follows are a proposed claim 1 and two possible implementations of the described method.

Figure 1: General Quality Inspection Method

Create reference measure

Prepare object

Measure object

Analyze / Evaluate

Dynamic Decision


Page 02 of 3

This sequential procedure described in the proposed claim 1 can be reconfigured to work in an automatically operated loop for numerous similar parts wherein any described step would be configured to operate automatically. Those parts are essentially similar for one created measure, however, minor deviations due to preceding processes might occur. For one batch of objects/parts the initially created reference measure would not change, however, a flexible and intelligent interpretation during the analyzing step might be implemented.

In the loop, the first step is to prepare the object of interest so that meaningful measurements can be taken or a meaningful measurement procedure can be conducted. This might include, but not limited to: object positioning and /or object rotation with respect to the measurement unit; object positioning and rotation with respect to one or more additional enhancement unit (a unit that would improve the measurement process in a in terms of robustness and reliability)

An example of an enhancement unit might be a light source to support measurements taken by a camera, a noise damping chamber supporting acoustic measurements with a microphone, etc.! Given an industrial environment on the factory floor, an enhancement unit would also include a ventilation system t...