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A Method to Validate an Online Inspection Measurement System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000244306D
Publication Date: 2015-Dec-01
Document File: 4 page(s) / 231K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

This publication describes a method for validating online inspection and measurement systems One of the key questions that often goes unanswered with an installed operational system is do you know if is truly performing as you would expect it should This paper describes a method to validate an online quality system An example is provided for a nonwoven uniformity system

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A Method to Validate an Online Inspection / Measurement System Abstract

This publication describes a method for validating online inspection and measurement systems. One of the key questions that often goes unanswered with an installed operational system is: do you know if is truly performing as you would expect it should? This paper describes a method to validate an online quality system. An example is provided for a nonwoven uniformity system.

Introduction

With any quality control instrument or system, the expectation is that once the unit is calibrated it will produce a known, repeatable result for a known sample. This is often straightforward for an offline or standalone instrument. Often, a standard is supplied with the instrument that can be loaded and measured to verify that the unit is operating as expected. In some cases, the standard is made from the product produced. This is non-ideal, as over time this type of standard tends to wear.

For instruments or systems that are integrated into a manufacturing process, the validation process is much more difficult. The validation process is often accomplished by one of the following ways:

1. Replicating the original setup as close as possible. Assumption: the system will performed as expected. Replicating the original setup can mean many things such as instrument alignment, sensitivity adjustments, etc.

2. Saving a production roll of material with a known response and re-running that roll to verify the response.

3. Running the material through another duplicate system to verify that the results match.

Each of these validation processes have their drawbacks. The first method requires a big assumption that the system will respond as expected while maintaining an original setup and not performing some sort of real validation. Often, this method is chosen when empirical testing has been done over a long period of time to prove this method can be trusted. The second method requires time on the production machine and the potential sacrifice of expensive material. Likewise, the third method requires an additional capital investment with a second system and the potential sacrifice of expensive material.

This paper describes the validation of an online wide-web instrumentation system through the processing of a material simulating material that can be easily transported through the instrumentation system. The simulated material is generated using an offline process which is low cost, highly re-producible, and produces a response similar to the real material. This simulated material is then fed through the instrumentation system manually or with integrated verification hardware.

Implementation

The example that will be discussed is from the online nonwoven uniformity measurement system.

The first step was to develop a material or standard to be used in the system. The system measures formed nonwoven fibers that often may or may not have any structural integrity at the time of measurement....