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System for optimal spot color rendering control

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000244514D
Publication Date: 2015-Dec-17
Document File: 2 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Current DFE ("Digital Front End", i.e., the software associated with sending color image data to a digital printer) user defined spot color recipe designation schemes (such as FFPS Spot Color Editor) allow for one designation for all objects types (e.g., text, graphics). The user defined recipes are mainly used when a spot color is outside the gamut of the print device. If a user does not define a recipe the DFE's automated rendering system will make a best fit for the spot color using the colorants available on the print system. Customers can have different requirements for spot color rendering based on object types. For example, the user may want a darker rendition for text (as compared to graphics rendering) to enable increased legibility. What is needed is a system that allows spot color recipe designation for text (fonts) vs. graphics objects in a specific page or throughout job. The Spot Color Editor GUI (graphical user interface) adds a menu selection for the definition of spot color recipes for text vs. graphics. The system database for spot color recipes adds a field for object type, which is populated when a recipe is saved by a user. Expanding on the current FFPs page exception programming concept, the designation of whether an object will be rendered with the above defined recipe or computed using the destination profile will be selectable at a job, page or range of pages basis. The designations for text vs. graphics are independent. When jobs are being processed the RIP facility will determine the object type (defined in the PDL) and the recipe selection that is being rendered with a spot color call. When the RIP requests the colorant recipes (e.g., CMYK colorant values) from the Spot Color Service, an additional object type attribute is communicated. The SCS provides the recipe (to the RIP) based on the object type. If the spot color name does not request or have a defined recipe, the SCS will determine a recipe using the destination profile and CIELAB values from the spot vendors. The Spot Color Editor GUI adds a menu selection for the definition of spot color recipes for text vs. graphics. The system database for spot color recipes adds a field for object type, which is populated when a recipe is saved by a user. To enable the above an additional field is added to the custom spot database, the filed values will be: 1. Text 2. Graphics 3. Text_graphics -- for both Expanding on the current FFPs page exception programming concept, the designation of whether an object will be rendered with the above defined recipe or computed using the destination profile will be selectable at a job, page or range of pages basis. The designations for text vs. graphics are independent. To enable the above an additional Boolean attributes are added for queue/job/ page exception: 1. textSpotCustom – true results in the use of defined spot color recipes vs. computation 2. graphicsSpotCustom – true results in the use of defined spot color recipes vs. computation When jobs are being processed the RIP facility will determine the object type (defined in the PDL) and the recipe selection that is being rendered with a spot color call. When the RIP requests the colorant recipes (e.g., CMYK colorant values) from the Spot Color Service, the following additional information is communicated: 1. object type 2. use recipe or computation The SCS provides the recipe (to the RIP) based on the object type. If the spot color name does not request or have a defined recipe, the SCS will determine a recipe using the destination profile and CIELAB values from the spot vendors. Extensions: 1. The idea could be extended to include recipe definition for all spot types (e.g., fonts, strokes, fills). 2. The idea could be extended to use different automated spot rendering schemes based on object type (e.g., different gamut mapping algorithms). For example use "lightness preservation" for graphics and "hue preservation" for fonts. 3. The idea could be extended to print different spot colorant sets based on object type for fonts with CMYK, and graphics with CMYK+Orange (or other spot or extension colors).

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System for optimal spot color rendering control

Current DFE ("Digital Front End", i.e., the software associated with sending color image data to a digital printer) user defined spot color recipe designation schemes (such as FFPS Spot Color Editor) allow for one designation for all objects types (e.g., text, graphics). The user defined recipes are mainly used when a spot color is outside the gamut of the print device. If a user does not define a recipe the DFE's automated rendering system will make a best fit for the spot color using the colorants available on the print system. Customers can have different requirements for spot color rendering based on object types. For example, the user may want a darker rendition for text (as compared to graphics rendering) to enable increased legibility.

What is needed is a system that allows spot color recipe designation for text (fonts) vs. graphics objects in a specific page or throughout job.

The Spot Color Editor GUI (graphical user interface) adds a menu selection for the definition of spot color recipes for text vs. graphics. The system database for spot color recipes adds a field for object type, which is populated when a recipe is saved by a user.

Expanding on the current FFPs page exception programming concept, the designation of whether an object will be rendered with the above defined recipe or computed using the destination profile will be selectable at a job, page or range of pages basis. The designations for text vs. graphics are independent.

When jobs are being processed the RIP facility will determine the object type (defined in the PDL) and the recipe selection that is being rendered with a spot color call. When the RIP requests the colorant recipes (e.g., CMYK colorant values) from the Spot Color Service, an additional object type attribute is communicated. The SCS provides the recipe (to the RIP) based on the object type. If the spot color name does not request or have a defined recipe, the SCS will determine a recipe using the destination profile and CIELAB values from the spot vendors.

The Spot Color Editor GUI adds a menu selection for the definition...