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TURBOFAN ENGINE BOOSTER OUTLET GUIDE VANE POSITIONING FOR FOREIGN MATTER CONTROL

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000244540D
Publication Date: 2015-Dec-18
Document File: 9 page(s) / 161K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

A typcial large commercial turbofan engine incorporates a booster compressor with a row of stationary vanes ("booster OGVs") positioned downstream of the last row of rotating booster blades. The booster OGVs may be positioned such that foreign matter discharged from the booster OGVs does not strike struts positioned downstream of the booster.

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TURBOFAN ENGINE BOOSTER OUTLET GUIDE VANE POSITIONING FOR FOREIGN MATTER CONTROL

ABSTRACT


[0001] A typcial large commercial turbofan engine incorporates a booster compressor with a row of stationary vanes ("booster OGVs") positioned downstream of the last row of rotating booster blades. The booster OGVs may be positioned such that foreign matter discharged from the booster OGVs does not strike struts positioned downstream of the booster.

BACKGROUND


[0002] This disclosure relates generally to gas turbine engines, and more particularly to turbofan engines.


[0003] Existing low-pressure compressor or "booster" designs for large commercial turbofan engines typically feature outlet guide vane ("OGV") circumferential positioning based on traditional aerodynamic and mechanical design considerations, but not ingested foreign matter trajectories. Ingestion of foreign matter such as ice crystals can have a negative impact on compression system operability and durability.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS


[0004] The concept may be best understood by reference to the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing figures, in which:


[0005] FIG. 1 is a schematic cross-sectional view of a turbofan engine;


[0006] FIG. 2 is a schematic cross-sectional view of a fan and booster of a turbofan engine;


[0007] FIG. 3 is a front elevation view of a fan hub frame shown in FIG. 2;

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[0008] FIG. 4 is a schematic top plan view of a portion of a turbofan booster assembly constructed in accordance with one of the concepts disclosed herein; and


[0009] FIG. 5 is a schematic top plan view of a portion of a turbofan booster assembly constructed in accordance with one of the concepts disclosed herein.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE CONCEPT


[0010] Now, referring to the drawings wherein identical reference numerals denote the same elements throughout the various views, FIG. 1 illustrates a gas turbine engine, generally designated 10, having a longitudinal centerline axis 11. The engine 10 includes a gas generator core 16 which is composed of a multi-stage high pressure compressor ("HPC") 18, a combustor 20, and a high pressure turbine ("HPT") 22, either single or multiple stages, all arranged coaxially about the centerline axis 11 in a serial, axial flow relationship. An annular outer drive shaft 24 interconnects the compressor 18 and high pressure turbine 22.


[0011] In operation, pressurized air from the HPC 18 is mixed with fuel in the combustor 20 and ignited, thereby generating combustion gases. Some work is extracted from these gases by the high pressure turbine 22 which drives the compressor 18. The remainder of the combustion gases are discharged from the core 16 into a low pressure turbine ("LPT") 26.


[0012] An inner drive shaft 28 is mounted for rotation relative to the outer drive shaft
24. The inner drive shaft 28 is driven by the low pressure turbine 26 and drives a forward fan shaft 30, which in turn drives a fan 3...