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"DRAGONFLY DRONES" TO ADDRESS THE THREAT OF ROGUE UAVS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000244729D
Publication Date: 2016-Jan-06
Document File: 4 page(s) / 124K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Chuck Byers: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A fleet of "Dragonfly" Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) is deployed to protect sensitive areas against rogue drones. Upon the sensor network detecting an unauthorized UAV approaching prohibited airspace, a Dragonfly is launched, overtakes the rogue, and fires snares to capture the rogue. A soft landing process gently brings the rogue down and into the hands of the authorities without destroying or seriously damaging it.

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"DRAGONFLY DRONES" TO ADDRESS THE THREAT OF ROGUE UAVS

AUTHORS:

  Chuck Byers Gonzalo Salgueiro Joe Clarke

CISCO SYSTEMS, INC.

ABSTRACT

    A fleet of "Dragonfly" Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) is deployed to protect sensitive areas against rogue drones. Upon the sensor network detecting an unauthorized UAV approaching prohibited airspace, a Dragonfly is launched, overtakes the rogue, and fires snares to capture the rogue. A soft landing process gently brings the rogue down and into the hands of the authorities without destroying or seriously damaging it.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

     Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), or "drones" are exploding in popularity, both for entertainment and serious commercial use. However, with their increasing popularity come problems when they stray into protected air spaces, or are potentially vehicles for illegal activity (including terrorist attacks). It is difficult to stop a suspicious UAV in mid-flight. Various jamming systems and directed energy weapons have been proposed to bring them down, but this is dangerous to property and bystanders. Also destroying a rogue drone at altitude or causing it to crash land could cause any payload it may be carrying to explode or disburse, greatly magnifying the problem.

    What is needed is a controlled, safe way to bring down unauthorized UAVs without destroying them. Presented herein is a possible approach that can make UAV airways safer, and governments worldwide may be more inclined to authorize their accelerated deployment for many beneficial uses.

    This solution involves the construction of a fleet of heavy, large, fast, powerful interceptor UAVs (called "Dragonflies" after the fierce predator insect). These could be owned by first responders or aviation authorities, and would be stationed on perches

Copyright 2016 Cisco Systems, Inc.
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located at regular intervals across an urban area, perhaps supplemented by extra perches located next to sensitive targets (industrial sites, stadiums, government buildings, parks, etc.) or on vehicles in support of temporary events.

    The Dragonfly is equipped with a special payload (depicted in the figure below as the red and blue box). When a rogue UAV is detected, the closest dragonfly is dispatched, and flies fast to intercept it (step 2). In step 3, the dragonfly positions itself just above the rogue UAV. It deploys a set of snare lines (shown in blue) designed to entangle themselves in the rogue's props. This deployment could be via ballistics, rockets, springs or gravity. The preferred method would be the same type of electrically fired compressed gas cartridge that deploys the darts in Tasers. The snares could be a dozen or so Kevlar ribbons, perhaps with weights, magnets, or flypaper-like surfaces to improve the probability of capture and minimize the possibility of fowling the dragonfly's own props.

    Once the rogue is hopelessly tangled in the snare, the Dragonfly has two options. If the rogue is comparatively small...