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Mobile HUD Implementation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000244766D
Publication Date: 2016-Jan-12
Document File: 4 page(s) / 73K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

This invention proposes a lenticular lens covering the mobile device for use in a vehicles. This would allow the driver looking directly at the screen to see the display as normal, but light exiting at an acute angle from the the top of the device could either be dimmed to avoid distraction, or used to construct an image when viewed in the reflection of the windshield could provide vital information in a "see through" form similar to commercial Heads Up Displays (HUDs).

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Mobile HUD Implementation

Today smartphones and mobile devices have in many cases replaced in vehicle navigation systems. This is largely because the life cycle for mobile devices is much shorter than that for motor vehicles, so the functionality on the users mobile phone is likely to be much more current than their in-car head unit. People often use navigation software to assist with finding their way to their destination by placing their mobile device on some sort of car mount, which is often stuck to the vehicles windshield. Such devices can also be integrated with other vehicle systems such as a Bluetooth connection to the OBD-II bus.

While this works well, there are often drawbacks:

The mobile device has limited screen size, so can take more concentration to look at


1.

Having a large screen device such as a tablet computer would block visibility for the driver


2.

Often a bright display can cause unwanted reflections on the windshield causing distraction to the driver

3.

This invention proposes a lenticular lens covering the mobile device. This would allow the driver looking directly at the screen to see the display as normal, but light exiting at an acute angle from the the top of the device could either be dimmed to avoid distraction, or used to construct an image when viewed in the reflection of the windshield could provide vital information in a "see through" form similar to commercial Heads Up Displays (HUDs). A camera situated near the driver could optionally scan a test pattern on start up, to wirelessly provide keystone correction information back to the application on the mobile device.

Mobile displays are getting higher and higher pixel density, and have now reached the point where there is more pixels than the human eye can distinguish during normal viewing. Some mobile devices have successfully employed lenticular displays to provide each eye different images for 3D viewing.

Commercial vehicle HUDs are available for installation, or are being included with new motor vehicles, however these do not allow the user to use their own mobile device.

Figure #1 below shows a mob...