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Active Phone Call Entry Queuing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000244791D
Publication Date: 2016-Jan-15
Document File: 3 page(s) / 54K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a system and method that provide an additional step to hold an entered conference call passcode in an area before the system transmits it to the conference bridge. This enables the user to make any corrections before submitting the code and avoid returning to the beginning of the entire process to correct a small mistake.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

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Active Phone Call Entry Queuing

It is often necessary to type in codes when interacting with telephone systems, such as conference bridges and Interactive voice response (IVR) solutions. For example, to participate in a business teleconference, a user dials into the main conference bridge and then is prompted to enter a passcode. If the user incorrectly enters the passcode, then the system sends the user back to the beginning of the login process. An easier method is needed for a user to correct passcode errors (e.g., mistyping a digit) before the passcode is transmitted to the system.

Disclosed is a system and method that provide an additional step to hold an entered code in an area before the system transmits it to the phone system. This enables the user to make any corrections before submitting the code and avoid returning to the beginning of the entire process to correct a small mistake.

To implement this system and method, a user calls into a teleconference system or other phone system (e.g., banking, phone cards, etc.) per current processes. The system prompts the user for a passcode or other identifying information (e.g., passcodes, security codes, social security numbers, account numbers, etc.). The user has the option to enter digits in a holding area, which enables the correction of any entry mistakes before transmitting the passcode.

If the user makes a mistake while inputting the requested code, then the user may go back and amend it. In this example (Figures 1 and 2), the passcode should be 1234, not 1235.

Figure 1: The passcode holding area with the incorrect digit entered

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Figure 2: Correct passcode entered in t...