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Knife Collar Lockout

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000244823D
Publication Date: 2016-Jan-19
Document File: 5 page(s) / 439K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Energy devices with separate clamping and cutting mechanisms have a need to preventusability errors of unintentionally cutting unsealed tissue. A first problem to be solved is to ensure that the user has adequately clamped on tissue before the integrated knife can be deployed. Clamping of the tissue between the device jaws is important as it secures and controls the tissue during both energy delivery and transection. Tissue that is not secure may be inadvertently pulled out of the jaws due naturally occurring tissue tension or tension due to device manipulation. Once out of the jaws the tissue may retract and no longer be visible or easily accessible. Bleeding control becomes difficult under such circumstances. A second problem to be solved is to ensure that the integrated knife is fully retracted when the user unclamps and releases the tissue. This is important to minimize the likelihood of inadvertently cutting tissue due to the knife blade being exposed. Both problems can be solved with the incorporation of a knife lockout. The knife lockout may be configured in a variety of ways. The idea disclosed herein places the lock on the jaw closure lever and a knife collar within the device handle which limits the movement of the knife to specific conditions.

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Knife Collar Lockout

Summary:

Energy devices with separate clamping and cutting mechanisms have a need to prevent usability errors of unintentionally cutting unsealed tissue. A first problem to be solved is to ensure that the user has adequately clamped on tissue before the integrated knife can be deployed. Clamping of the tissue between the device jaws is important as it secures and controls the tissue during both energy delivery and transection. Tissue that is not secure may be inadvertently pulled out of the jaws due naturally occurring tissue tension or tension due to device manipulation. Once out of the jaws the tissue may retract and no longer be visible or easily accessible. Bleeding control becomes difficult under such circumstances. A second problem to be solved is to ensure that the integrated knife is fully retracted when the user unclamps and releases the tissue. This is important to minimize the likelihood of inadvertently cutting tissue due to the knife blade being exposed. Both problems can be solved with the incorporation of a knife lockout. The knife lockout may be configured in a variety of ways. The idea disclosed herein places the lock on the jaw closure lever and a knife collar within the device handle which limits the movement of the knife to specific conditions.

Description:

Most energy devices have a closure lever for moving the jaws from an open position to a closed position. Jaw closure is typically achieved by rotating the closure lever about a pivot from a first position to a second position. Devices with integrated knives generally have a second trigger to control cutting. Typically depressing the second trigger from a first position to a second position translates the knife from a retracted position through the tissue thus transecting it. Releasing the second trigger retracts the knife again. The knife may have a collar or yoke within the device handle acting as a linkage between the knife blade and the second trigger. This idea centers on limiting the movement of the knife collar in relationship to the closure trigger.


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