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ENABLING VIDEO ON DEFAULT (NON-QOS) BEARERS IN LTE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000244827D
Publication Date: 2016-Jan-19
Document File: 8 page(s) / 175K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Ritesh Madan: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

There is a minimum throughput required to sustain video in a Long Term Evolution (LTE) system, and when User Equipment (UEs) are using bandwidth in increasing order of spectral efficiency, this may lead to a situation where some users get much higher throughput than required to support video but others get throughput lower than required to support video. The solution presented herein changes fairness such that the rate of the high throughput UEs is reduced to give more resources to low throughput UEs. The challenge is that it may not be feasible to give minimum rate guarantees to all users. Some intelligence is needed to choose which users are given minimum rate guarantees.

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ENABLING VIDEO ON DEFAULT (NON-QOS) BEARERS IN LTE

AUTHORS:

   Ritesh Madan Ethan Haghani Kedar Shirali Vikram Chandrasekhar

Jim Seymour

CISCO SYSTEMS, INC.

ABSTRACT

    There is a minimum throughput required to sustain video in a Long Term Evolution (LTE) system, and when User Equipment (UEs) are using bandwidth in increasing order of spectral efficiency, this may lead to a situation where some users get much higher throughput than required to support video but others get throughput lower than required to support video. The solution presented herein changes fairness such that the rate of the high throughput UEs is reduced to give more resources to low throughput UEs. The challenge is that it may not be feasible to give minimum rate guarantees to all users. Some intelligence is needed to choose which users are given minimum rate guarantees.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

    In Long Term Evolution (LTE) systems, Quality of Service (QoS) is used to distinguish service priority for certain traffic. Many service providers (operators) do not run video on certain traffic, such as traffic with the QoS Class Identifier (QCI) 2. It would be desirable to modify the Radio Resource Management (RRM) framework for small cells to enable a greater number of User Equipment (UEs) to stream video or do live video sessions. There is an assumption that operators enable only default/best effort bearers (QCI 8/9) for video, which bearers are used to run other applications as well.

Copyright 2016 Cisco Systems, Inc.

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Consider the following example.

10 MHz bandwidth - effective data bandwidth on downlink assumed to be 7 MHz Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of UEs = [-2 0 2 5 5 7 10]

Simple Spec Eff model: 3 dB backoff with respect to Shannon capacity

Assume video requires 700 Kbps at media access control (MAC) layer Proportional Fair Throughputs (Mbps): total of 8.5 Mbps is as follows

[0.3780 0.5590 0.8044 1.3066 1.3066 1.7283 2.4679]

    A Scheduler provides minimum rate guarantees and will support video for all UEs and still have 18% left over bandwidth. The total throughput will be 6.44 Mbps.

    In reality, to sustain two-way video, a UE would need to sustain 700 Kbps on both downlink (DL) and uplink (UL). Similar ideas carry over to joint UP and DL assignment. For some bearers, DL streaming video can be sustained without allowing for two way video.

    A Proportional Fair/RR Schedule may be used. In a cell, connected UEs 1, …, N, each has one QCI 8/9 bearer. The effective bandwidth for data (accounting for various control/reference signals) on DL, UL is BDL, BUL.

The spectral efficiency of UEi:
- DL: 𝐾𝐾𝑖𝑖𝐷𝐷𝐷𝐷. On DL, spectral efficiency is roughly the reported modulation coding scheme (MCS).

- UL: πΎπΎπ‘–π‘–π‘ˆπ‘ˆπ·π·. On UL, spectral efficiency is a function of channel gain, interference, number of radio resource blocks (RBs) assigned in one transmission time interval (TTI), and power control parame...