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Browse Prior Art Database

Near Eye Display based on a single light-engine for both eyes

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000244890D
Original Publication Date: 2016-Jan-27
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2016-Jan-27
Document File: 4 page(s) / 122K

Publishing Venue

Microsoft

Related People

Amir Nevet: INVENTOR [+6]

Abstract

Near Eye Displays (NED), either for Augmented or Virtual reality, require separate projection of information for each of the eyes to generate realistic 3D images. In order to generate different images for each of the eyes, NEDs are built using two separate light-engines. Each of the light-engines usually includes RGB light sources (LEDs or LDs), optics and a microdisplay (e.g. LCD, LCoS, MEMS mirrors, DMD). These light-engines has a non-negligible size and cost, making it difficult to build small-size, light weight, low cost wearable displays for the consumer market. At the same time, the continuous demand for higher resolution is making these light-engines even bigger.

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Document Author Amir Nevet
Names of all Contributors Amir Nevet, Asaf Pellman, David Cohen, David Mandelbaum, Giora Yahav, Dafna Bortman-Arbiv
Defensive Publication Title Near Eye Display based on a single light-engine for both eyes

Problem:

Near Eye Displays (NED), either for Augmented or Virtual reality, require separate projection of information for each of the eyes to generate realistic 3D images. In order to generate different images for each of the eyes, NEDs are built using two separate light-engines. Each of the light-engines usually includes RGB light sources (LEDs or LDs), optics and a microdisplay (e.g. LCD, LCoS, MEMS mirrors, DMD). These light-engines has a non-negligible size and cost, making it difficult to build small-size, light weight, low cost wearable displays for the consumer market. At the same time, the continuous demand for higher resolution is making these light-engines even bigger.

 

Description:

Here we propose a mechanism based on a single Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) (or a single fast 2D scanning MEMS mirror) displaying images to both eyes, reducing size, cost, weight and enabling better scalability with increased resolution. In one embodiment of the invention the light-engine is also using only a single set of RGB light sources.

DMDs are arrays of MEMS mirrors. Each micromirror has two positions (e.g. +/-10deg) controlled using external voltage. Light impinging on the mirror is reflected to either of the two directions while maintain its polarization. One of these directions is coupling to the optical system (‘On’ state) while light reflected to the other direction is being blocked (‘Off’ state), and the light intensity per pixel per color is controlled by the ratio between ‘On’ to ‘Off’ state of the mirror.

Here we propose to use the unique property of mirrors-based uDisplay, being polarization agnostics, vs. LCoS and LCD which operate on a specific polarization, to use one uDisplay for both eyes and separate between the eyes based on light polarization. A straightforward option using two different light sources with perpendicular polarization is presented in the schematic drawing:

In this example the DMD is operated at twice the frame rate of a single eye (e.g. 120Hz*3 colors) and the light sources are t...